SCURRILOUS

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Dr. Goodword
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SCURRILOUS

Postby Dr. Goodword » Wed Feb 01, 2006 12:35 am

• scurrilous •

Pronunciation: skêr-ê-lês • Hear it!

Part of Speech: Adjective

Meaning: 1. Vulgar or obscene, expressed in vulgar or obscene terms. 2. Containing vulgar, obscene, or slanderous accusations.

Notes: Today's word is an extension of scurrile (see Word History), a word that is still available though a tad archaic. This parent word has the advantage of a full family, including a noun, scurrility, adverb, scurrilely, and a verb scurrilize. Scurrilous has only the adverb, scurrilously, and a longish noun, scurrilousness.

In Play: Scurrilous is seldom used to refer to obscene language, but it certainly remains fit for the task: "Scurrilous language reflects scurrilous minds." It is most often used to refer to viciously false verbal attacks: "Everyone agreed that Dwight Mann did not deserve the scurrilous accusations made against him by his business partner."

Word History: Today's Good Word is an extension of its ancestor, scurrile with the suffix -ous. Scurrile has the same meaning as scurrilous and came to French from Latin scurrilis "jeering, buffonish", the adjective of the noun scurra "buffoon". Scurra was borrowed from Etruscan, a language spoken in Italy before the arrival of the Romans. We only have short phrases from this language on pottery shards, lintels, and the like, so little is known about it.
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Stargzer
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Re: SCURRILOUS

Postby Stargzer » Wed Feb 01, 2006 1:26 am

Dr. Goodword wrote: . . . Notes: Today's word is an extension of scurrile (see Word History), a word that is still available though a tad archaic. . . .


See? I knew that was a Good Word! :wink:
Regards//Larry

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Flaminius
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Postby Flaminius » Wed Feb 01, 2006 5:04 am

Scurra was borrowed from Etruscan, a language spoken in Italy before the arrival of the Romans. We only have short phrases from this language on pottery shards, lintels, and the like, so little is known about it.


I long thought satellite is from Etruscan but even that is not well-established.

Flam


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