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ABROGATE

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ABROGATE

Postby Dr. Goodword » Fri Apr 28, 2006 10:22 pm

• abrogate •

Pronunciation: æ-brê-geyt • Hear it!

Part of Speech: Verb, transitive

Meaning: 1. To repeal, annul, cancel, or abolish something such as a law. 2. To obviate, do away with, put an end to.

Notes: This word has a large and happy family. The person who abrogates is an abrogator who carries out the act of abrogation. Such an act is abrogative and any law that may be abrogated is abrogatable. The adjectives, in their turn, have adverbs (abrogatively and abrogatably) and nouns (abrogativeness and abrogatability). Have fun.

In Play: Today's good verb applies to any type of regulation from an international law to a household rule: "The boss abrogated the company rule limiting visits to the water cooler to three per day when he found a dead chicken on his desk." The new meaning ("put an end to") originated in medicine but now we can all use it: "Melanie found that pint of Ben & Jerry's Cherry Garcia ice cream quickly abrogated all the tension that builds up in her during the work day."

Word History: Today's lexical darling come to English from Latin abrogatus, the past participle of abrogare "to repeal or annul", which is made up of ab "away" + the same rogare "to ask" that we see (and hear) in interrogate. In the Proto-Indo-European language, words containing [o] always had a variant containing [e], so the root, rog-, is the same as the reg- we see in regular and regal. It had to do with rule in both sense of the word and, in fact, rule itself is a French reduction of Latin regula "rule, ruler". (We would like to thank Susan Lister who, as a rule, sends us very Good Words like this one.)
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Re: ABROGATE

Postby gailr » Mon May 01, 2006 4:17 am

Dr. Goodword wrote:
...Today's lexical darling come to English from Latin abrogatus, the past participle of abrogare "to repeal or annul", which is made up of ab "away" + the same rogare "to ask" that we see (and hear) in interrogate...

This caught my eye. I wondered if it had anything to do with Rogation Sunday; and so it does. Apparently, this observance has been abrogated for the most part in the larger Church.
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