Alphadictionary.com

Our Sponsors

Technical Translation
Website Translation Clip Art
 

SOMNILOQUY

Use this forum to discuss past Good Words.

SOMNILOQUY

Postby Dr. Goodword » Tue May 09, 2006 11:57 pm

• somniloquy •

Pronunciation: sahm-ni-lê-kwi • Hear it!

Part of Speech: Noun

Meaning: 1. Talking in your sleep, sleep-talking. 2. What you say when you talk in your sleep.

Notes: This half-amusing Good Word is a member of a large and warm family, despite the fact that my spelling-checker is lighting up this paragraph like a Christmas tree with red lines as I write it. A person who engages in somniloquy is a somniloquist who becomes somniloquent when sleeping. When somniloquists somniloquize, they express themselves in somniloquies in the second meaning of today's word. Although somniloquies usually are soliloquies, be careful not to confuse the two.

In Play: Many people utter words and phrases related to the dreams they have as they sleep. However, a somniloquy can often be even more important than what we say when we are awake. A wife might ask a husband in the morning, "So, who is this 'Eleanor' you mentioned several times in your somniloquy last night?" Don't overlook the other members of this family of words. The same wife might comment, "I'm sleeping much better now that you have become less somniloquent at night."

Word History: Today's Good Word is made from the root of Latin somnus "sleep" + the verb loqui "to speak". Somnus is also responsible for the English words somnambulant "sleep-walking, sleep-walker" and somnolent, the grown-up word for "sleepy". The same Proto-Indo-European root that produced somnus turned up in Greek as hypnos "sleep", which we see at the root of our word, hypnotism. In Russian it became son "sleep or dream". The root of the Latin verb loqui "to talk or speak" is also present in English loquacious "talkative" and eloquent. (Margie Sved was not just talking in her sleep when she nominated this fascinating noun as a Good Word.)
• The Good Dr. Goodword
User avatar
Dr. Goodword
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3350
Joined: Wed Feb 02, 2005 9:28 am
Location: Lewisburg, PA

Postby scw1217 » Wed May 10, 2006 9:19 am

I am so glad to know there is a word for this. When I was a young girl, I once spent the night (first time and last) with a girl who did this the entire night. It so creeped me out that I left early the next day and never stayed there again!

On the other hand, many have been the dreams where I called out in my sleep myself. So now looking back, perhaps I should not be the "pot calling the kettle black". However, in my defense, she was talking, carrying on a conversation, not simply crying out in the midst of some dream.
User avatar
scw1217
Lexiterian
 
Posts: 258
Joined: Mon Sep 26, 2005 7:50 am
Location: Florida, USA

Postby Stargzer » Wed May 10, 2006 4:08 pm

My father never talked in his sleep; he swore. :shock: 8)
Regards//Larry

"To preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of the people always possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them."
-- Attributed to Richard Henry Lee
User avatar
Stargzer
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 2545
Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2005 3:56 pm
Location: Crownsville, MD

Postby Brazilian dude » Wed May 10, 2006 7:54 pm

Would that describe him as an insultuloquist* or impropriloquist?

*This one got me thinking, normally you'd have an i there, but I think that i comes from second declension masculine nouns, but insultus, us is a fourth declension noun. Oh well...

Brazilian dude
Languages rule!
Brazilian dude
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1464
Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2005 3:31 pm
Location: Botucatu - SP Brazil

Postby Stargzer » Wed May 10, 2006 11:53 pm

That almost sounds like a bad horror movie:

Insultus: The Declension From The Fourth Dimension

Watch as humans are forced to pronounce ancient words ending in us, us, ui, um, u, us, uum, ibus, us, ibus!
Regards//Larry

"To preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of the people always possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them."
-- Attributed to Richard Henry Lee
User avatar
Stargzer
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 2545
Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2005 3:56 pm
Location: Crownsville, MD

Postby gailr » Thu May 11, 2006 8:33 pm

Close, gzer, but I think you're missing some hype:

Insultus: The Declension From The Fourth Dimension

Watch as humans are forced to pronounce ancient words ending in us, us, ui, um, u, us, uum, ibus, us, ibus!

Scream as they fight to the death over classical wersus Curia pronunchiations!

Thrill as a nimble few survive!

You'll laugh; you'll cry; you'll never use the subjunctive lightly again!


-gailr
User avatar
gailr
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1945
Joined: Tue Mar 15, 2005 11:40 am

Postby Brazilian dude » Thu May 11, 2006 11:15 pm

Hahaha, wersus is horrible, by the way, no matter what some people may say to try to convince me of the opposite.

Brazilian dude
Languages rule!
Brazilian dude
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1464
Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2005 3:31 pm
Location: Botucatu - SP Brazil

Postby Stargzer » Fri May 12, 2006 3:49 pm

Weni, Widi, Wiki!
Regards//Larry

"To preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of the people always possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them."
-- Attributed to Richard Henry Lee
User avatar
Stargzer
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 2545
Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2005 3:56 pm
Location: Crownsville, MD

Postby Brazilian dude » Fri May 12, 2006 6:38 pm

Wiki to me is something related to Wikipedia.

Brazilian dude
Languages rule!
Brazilian dude
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1464
Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2005 3:31 pm
Location: Botucatu - SP Brazil


Return to Good Word Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest