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Postby frank » Tue Jun 06, 2006 9:17 am

Huny wrote:I would never try to learn another language (other than that of my native or first language) without first knowing the meaning behind the language itself. It is simply called History!!


I'd rather call it a lame excuse :-)

Nah, seriously, what do you mean by "the meaning behind the language itself"? And what does "History" have to do with it?

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Postby Perry » Tue Jun 06, 2006 10:03 am

I wonder-- does "BD" live in the USA or Brazil? Hmm??...I would never try to learn another language (other than that of my native or first language) without first knowing the meaning behind the language itself. It is simply called History!!


A quick look at the left side of BD's posts (and everyone else's) shows his (their) location; in his case Brazil.

I always thought that languages evolve. With the possible exception of codes, I don't know of any language that came into being because of a meaning behind it. On the other hand, by applying oneself to a thorough study of a language, one can learn the nuances of its words. It is simply called linguistics. Excuse the sarcasm. :oops:

BD, I know you well enough to appreciate the humor in "and what's the problem with that?". But most of us would dislike forceably changing our culture and language. (I have done this in the past on a volunteer basis; it was more motivating.)
"Time is nature's way of keeping everything from happening all at once. Lately it hasn't been working."
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Postby gailr » Tue Jun 06, 2006 10:58 am

Perry wrote:But most of us would dislike forceably changing our culture and language. (I have done this in the past on a volunteer basis; it was more motivating.)


Good points, Perry!

I'd add further that the first one in particular was glossed over quite lightly in 12 years of "American [sic] History" classes, both public and parochial. Yet, records of less than glorious chapters in US Military History, such as running roughshod over "native" languages and cultures within these borders, were and still are there for anyone to find. Sadly, similar actions can be found in the history of any country whose inhabitants speak more than one language or embrace more than one culture.

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Postby Brazilian dude » Tue Jun 06, 2006 12:14 pm

I have not changed my language or my culture, yet I speak a bunch of languages. I repeat: What IS the problem with that?

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Postby Huny » Tue Jun 06, 2006 2:13 pm

I was simply referring to some posts made by BD and others on Mon. May 29 '06 re: why we should thank a soldier. I was referring to why we as Americans (in general) thank our Soldiers for being able to continue speaking English. It is because we are still a free country. I was not referenceing any other country in the war efforts because I could have been there all night in trying to do so. So, I tried to keep it down to a dull roar. It seemed to me that at the time,maybe BD had a not so clear understanding of our Memorial Day. That is how I looked at it. I saw where several other people where trying to inform him and I felt he was being sarcastic toward some people. I don't mean learn the history behind the language itself when learning another language, I simply mean to learn the history behind that of the people who speak the languages that anyone may learn. I feel it would give people a better understanding of what they are saying. It helps when interacting with people from other coltures when you have learned and can speak their language. It never hurts to learn something new. Maybe I missed something frome those posts that day? Maybe I just had a brain fart. If so,I apologize. And as for the rest, that is my dry humor. :D

And actualy, BD, there is no problem with your speaking several different languages. I was thinking to myself while reading some of your postings that you may actualy know many languages. Just something I picked up on. The question about if you lived in the US or Brazil was meant to actualy be a complement. I did see where you were from. Its just that I am aware English is a hard language to learn much less knowing several other languages. I commend you for it!! Remember, I always try to keep an open mind about everything. That is who I am.
"What lies behind us and what lies ahead of us are tiny matters compaired to what lies inside us." R.W.E.
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Postby Brazilian dude » Tue Jun 06, 2006 2:45 pm

It is because we are still a free country. I was not referenceing any other country in the war efforts because I could have been there all night in trying to do so. So, I tried to keep it down to a dull roar.

Oh, by we you meant Americans. Okay, then, misunderstanding cleared.

It seemed to me that at the time,maybe BD had a not so clear understanding of our Memorial Day.

I know very well what Memorial Day is. I've lived in the States myself.

Its just that I am aware English is a hard language to learn much less knowing several other languages

Not at all. English is the easiest language I've learned. It's too regular, you know, close to no verb conjugations, no genders, no subjunctive, not many inflections.

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Postby Huny » Tue Jun 06, 2006 3:03 pm

BD,

I was only trying to complement you for your knowledge but I guess that backfired, too? I meant english is hard to learn because of all the slang. That is what I keep hearing from my friends from Mexico and Russia. Please don't feel like you have to be defensive. That is not what I am doing here. :D
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Postby Brazilian dude » Tue Jun 06, 2006 5:41 pm

I'm not being defensive at all, I just think that English is easy. I'll grant you this: the spelling can be tough sometimes.

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Postby Huny » Tue Jun 06, 2006 6:03 pm

BD- how may languages do you know fluently? You are right about the spelling. I wonder if it is because English is compiled of so may other languages. It's the French stuff that I can never get my mind around.(Sorry stargzer but it's true) I seem to grasp the concept of Spanish (a little of the Castilian with mostly Chicano) better than any other language (other than English of course, even then I still struggle!) A good many people here in the southern US can't understand why we see so much more spanish in our every day lives these days. And why don't we just stick to english. I reply back by saying, "When did they make English the official language around here? Where was I when that went down?" You can only guess at the blank stares I get as a response from that.
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Postby tcward » Tue Jun 06, 2006 7:00 pm

GailR, your post reminded me of a t-shirt I saw the other day on the Internet -- it said "Bad grammar makes me [SIC]!" ;)

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Postby tcward » Tue Jun 06, 2006 7:02 pm

Huny, take BD with a huge chunk of salt. He's a language genius, but he doesn't want to admit it.

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Postby Brazilian dude » Tue Jun 06, 2006 9:24 pm

Nah.

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Postby tcward » Wed Jun 07, 2006 11:01 am

See?

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Postby Stargzer » Wed Jun 07, 2006 3:14 pm

Brazilian dude wrote:
Actually, BD, if it wasn't for the combined efforts Allied soldiers, sailors, marines, airmen, merchant seaman, and civilian factory workers sixty-some-odd-years ago, we might be forced to read this in German, Japanese, or Italian.

And what's the problem with that?
E qual è il problema in ciò?
Darin finde ich kein Problem.
問題じゃない。

Brazilian dude


There goes BD, showing off again! :D

(Stargzer shows his jealous streak again)

The thing is, you have the choice language, you are not forced to speak a certain one. Unless you are in Québec. :wink:
Regards//Larry

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Postby Stargzer » Wed Jun 07, 2006 4:22 pm

Brazilian dude wrote: . . . English is the easiest language I've learned. It's too regular, you know, close to no verb conjugations, no genders, no subjunctive, not many inflections.

Brazilian dude


Well, we do have gender, just no separate declensions for masculine, feminine, or neuter nouns and adjectives, which does make things easier at times. Gender is easy to figure out: in general all things are inherently male (man), female (woman), or none-of-the-above (boat).
The old man and the old woman boarded the old boat.

Here, old doesn't have to change an ending to match the gender of the nouns. Things do get confusing when anthropomorphizing, though. A boat, for example, has a neuter gender, but boats are usually referred to as "she." Come to think of it, gender usually only comes into play with singular personal (he, she, it) or possessive (his, hers, its) pronouns.

The old man and the old woman boarded the old boat. She was in good shape for her age, with a nice round bottom.
Regards//Larry

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