STICKLER

Use this forum to discuss past Good Words.
User avatar
Dr. Goodword
Site Admin
Posts: 4313
Joined: Wed Feb 02, 2005 9:28 am
Location: Lewisburg, PA
Contact:

STICKLER

Postby Dr. Goodword » Sat Aug 18, 2007 11:09 pm

• stickler •

Pronunciation: stik-lêr • Hear it!

Part of Speech: Noun

Meaning: 1. Official regulator of a competition, umpire, referee. 2. Someone who is fussy about details, correctness, following the rules, going by the book.

Notes: Here is a word whose meaning has come a long way and has strayed off course again only recently as a result of being confused with the various meanings of stick (see Word History). The verb (to) stickle is still available with the meanings (1) to referee, judge, or umpire; (2) to strive diligently for; and, more recently, (3) to haggle, make difficulties, raise objections.

In Play: As always, I tend to rue the loss of a Good Word or even one of its meanings. I would love to hear wordplay like this: "I always liked those tennis matches when John McEnroe got a stickler of a stickler refereeing the game." However, I am also not one to cry over spilt milk, so let's enjoy the new meaning: "Morris Bedda is a stickler about everyone paying their own check when dining out."

Word History: Today's Good Word is an agent (doer) noun derived from the verb (to) stickle. This verb began its English life somewhere in the 9th century as stight "to order, arrange". By the 14th century it had become stightle "to order, control, govern". In the 16th century it was pronounced as it is today, stickle, and referred to a referee, umpire or other official regulator of a competition. From there it was only a hop and a skip to someone who plays strictly by the book and expects others to do so, too. (We are sticklers when it comes to thanking readers like Joy Aloisi for suggesting very Good Words like today's. So, thank you, Joy, for this one.)
• The Good Dr. Goodword

User avatar
Perry
Grand Panjandrum
Posts: 2306
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 9:50 am
Location: Asheville, NC

Postby Perry » Sun Aug 19, 2007 6:23 pm

This verb began its English life somewhere in the 9th century as stight "to order, arrange". By the 14th century it had become stightle "to order, control, govern". In the 16th century it was pronounced as it is today, stickle, and referred to a referee, umpire or other official regulator of a competition.


Aaah! That stickler needs to get his stight checked!
"Time is nature's way of keeping everything from happening all at once. Lately it hasn't been working."
Anonymous

User avatar
skinem
Grand Panjandrum
Posts: 1197
Joined: Thu Apr 27, 2006 4:33 pm
Location: Middle Tennessee

Postby skinem » Mon Aug 20, 2007 12:01 pm

Thanks for the word! I had no idea as to definition number one--that it referred to an official. Well know the second definition...


Return to “Good Word Discussion”

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Bing [Bot] and 1 guest