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SHINDIG

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SHINDIG

Postby Dr. Goodword » Wed Apr 25, 2012 10:46 pm

• shindig •

Pronunciation: shin-dig • Hear it!

Part of Speech: Noun

Meaning: (Slang) 1. A country dance party. 2. A lively, informal social get-together of any kind.

Notes: Shindigs once were limited to rural areas in United States, but the word has spread along with the popularity of country-western music. It came up accompanied by no relatives, but if I might make a suggestion, I would suggest shindigetty for the adjective meaning "like a shindig".

In Play: Because of the origin of today's word and its slanginess, it is often employed to refer to parties that get out of control: "I was invited to a shindig at Hardy Partier's tomorrow night and don't know if I should take a date or a bodyguard." It is used just as often to refer to a lively party: "Were you at Hank Epanki's shindig Saturday night? I heard it was quite a to-do."

Word History: This word might be just as it appears to be, a get-together in which everyone digs into their dance partner's shins. J. R. Bartlett in his Dictionary of Americanisms, 2nd edition (1859) defines as shin-dig as a Southern regionalism meaning "a blow on the shins". The fact that it remains a slang word reinforces assumption that its orgins are rural, since words from rural dialects are generally kept out of the mainstream lexicon. If this is the case, it was certainly guided by an old noun, shindy "an uproarious bout of merrymaking". Shinty or shinny was also an early name for ice-hockey. I suppose ice-hockey at the end of the 18th century could be seen as bout of uproarious merrymaking. (We can't throw a shindig for Albert Skiles, but we can thank him for suggesting today's Good Word.)
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Postby Slava » Wed Apr 25, 2012 11:54 pm

Shindigetty, dogdigetty, ooh what you do to me!

Way back when, I used to have an open house on the first Saturday of the month. Some of them did turn into quite nice shindigs.
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Postby LukeJavan8 » Thu Apr 26, 2012 2:38 pm

I more or less remember that song.
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Postby Philip Hudson » Sat Apr 28, 2012 12:51 am

I more remember that song.
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Postby LukeJavan8 » Sat Apr 28, 2012 11:04 am

...but isn't the first word: "hot-diggity"?
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Postby Philip Hudson » Sat Apr 28, 2012 5:42 pm

The song says "Hot diggity" but I liked Slava's "Shindigetty" too. PBS recently ran an oldies presentation and the song was included. Perry Como made it famous in 1956. Some of us were around at the time. The tune is very old, written in 1883. "Hot diggity dog!" is an old slang expression of uncertain origin. Al Jolson used the phrase in 1928. Most of us don't remember that.

See and hear it on:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zahYUpDg ... re=related
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Postby LukeJavan8 » Sat Apr 28, 2012 8:11 pm

I remember the phrase and the song made famous
by Perry Como, whom I also remember. I also remember
1956. Wow: beautiful video.
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