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SWASH

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SWASH

Postby Dr. Goodword » Tue May 08, 2012 11:02 pm

• swash •

Pronunciation: swahsh • Hear it!

Part of Speech: Verb, Noun

Meaning: 1. To splash, slosh or wash over noisily and rhythmically, as a large wave might swash against the shore. There is an implication of gracefulness and power that comes with this word, too. 2. To swagger, bluster. 3. (Noun) A ripple, one of the moving ridges that play across the surface of liquid when disturbed.

Notes: Today's word is used most frequently in the compounds swashbuckler and swashbuckling, which brings to mind pirates and Errol Flynn films. Modern movies that romanticize pirates have lent their romance to these compounds, hence the connotation of grace and agility. Swash can also refer to someone who swaggers or comports himself with braggadocio.

In Play: Mark Twain wrote in A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court, "The gusts of wind were flaring the torches and making the shadows swash about." But you, too, may use this word when you mean a sudden, powerful move that might produce a noise from the friction: "Manley suddenly swashed his arm through the air and a cab dropped out of nowhere and stopped at the curb."

Word History: You might want to know where the buckle came from in the compounds swashbuckling and swashbuckler. Swashbuckle was originally "someone who swings a sword at someone's shield", from swash + buckler "a small shield". Swash is an onomatopoeic formation, like swish, thud, crack, tinkle and hiss. Some are better than others. Cock-a-doodle-do is an onomatopoeic term for the sound of a rooster's crowing that falls considerably short of the mark. Buckler comes from Old French bouclier, from boucle "boss on a shield". Old French inherited this word from Latin buccula, diminutive of bucca "cheek".
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RE: swash, and buckle, too

Postby wurdpurrson » Fri May 11, 2012 3:10 pm

So. Is the Nike sports logo meant to denote power and grace? Or swagger and bluster and braggadoccio?

And buckle, from the French boucle: there is a fabric with a decided texture to it that is called bouclé. Where might this fit in?
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Postby LukeJavan8 » Fri May 11, 2012 5:24 pm

I'd heard it was called the "swoosh".
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Postby wurdpurrson » Fri May 11, 2012 9:01 pm

I've heard both terms. Guess it doesn't really matter to anyone but Nike what it means, as the brand appears to sell well, no?
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Re: RE: swash, and buckle, too

Postby Slava » Fri May 11, 2012 9:05 pm

wurdpurrson wrote:So. Is the Nike sports logo meant to denote power and grace? Or swagger and bluster and braggadoccio?

And buckle, from the French boucle: there is a fabric with a decided texture to it that is called bouclé. Where might this fit in?

Here's what etymonline has to say on the matter:
etymonline.com wrote:buckle
"spiked metal ring for holding a belt, etc., c.1300, bukel, from O.Fr. bocle "boss (of a shield), buckle, metal ring," 12c., from L. buccula "cheek strap of a helmet," dim. of bucca "cheek." The verb in this sense is late 14c., bokelen.

buckle
"distort, warp," 1520s, bokelen "to arch the body," from M.Fr. boucler "to bulge," from O.Fr. bocler "to bulge, curl," from bocle "boss of a shield."


So it appears to me that they are related, but through slightly different paths.

As to the first question, I'd have to say "Yes."
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Postby Perry Lassiter » Fri May 11, 2012 9:45 pm

You mean the Nike logo is NOT a boomerang?
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Postby LukeJavan8 » Sat May 12, 2012 11:06 am

I, and it is just me, have never heard it called that, just
the "swoosh".
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Postby Slava » Sat May 12, 2012 5:52 pm

LukeJavan8 wrote:I, and it is just me, have never heard it called that, just the "swoosh".
You're right, it's a swoosh. I've never heard it called a boomerang.
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Postby LukeJavan8 » Sat May 12, 2012 7:37 pm

It sort of looks like one in flight, but I've never
heard it called that. Some folks probably think it
is when they first see it.
It sort of reminds me of all the odd words used
in computer-speak these days: google, yahoo, bing, etc.
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Postby wurdpurrson » Sun May 13, 2012 2:04 am

Perry Lassiter wrote:You mean the Nike logo is NOT a boomerang?


Must be. The brand is secretly Australian/Aboriginal, and only the most astute of observers recognize it for what it is. Bravo, Perry Lassiter. Your astuteness is honored!
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Postby Perry Lassiter » Sun May 13, 2012 11:45 am

Bravo right back! Few appreciate my astuteness and weird humor!
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Postby wurdpurrson » Sun May 13, 2012 1:55 pm

Only the best of people appreciate the absurdities that Life dishes up. Weird humor is a manifestation of that quality. My favorite people are creative iconoclasts, self-effacing mad writers and left-over hippies. :0)
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Postby Perry Lassiter » Sun May 13, 2012 2:34 pm

Not sure if I qualify as self-effacing. I keep signing stuff I write and appearing in public to speak - if only to a small public!
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Postby Perry Lassiter » Sun May 13, 2012 2:36 pm

Oh - I am at my age, definitely left over. You must be an anthropologist!
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Postby bamaboy56 » Mon May 14, 2012 12:28 pm

Seems like some time ago I heard the logo called a swoosh. Haven't heard the term in a while, though. Before that, I thought the logo was just a fancy checkmark. Ha! Not sure how the swoosh came to represent the name of the company: Nike, the Greek goddess of strength, speed and victory (unless "swoosh" was meant to represent speed). Just a thought.
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