Canape

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Philip Hudson
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Re: CANAPÉ

Postby Philip Hudson » Mon Jan 28, 2013 11:47 pm

Thanks for the cat head biscuit definition, Perry. My dad said he grew up on sawmill gravy and cathead biscuits. He said sawmill gravy was white gravy made with Borden's condensed milk. There were no cows in the sawmill camps. I never thought to ask him what cathead biscuits were. My dad never had a beefsteak until he was fourteen. No fresh beef in sawmill towns either, only salted sowbelly.
It is dark at night, but the Sun will come up and then we can see.

Perry Lassiter
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Re: CANAPÉ

Postby Perry Lassiter » Thu Oct 30, 2014 2:37 pm

Ran across this today and noticed no Brit had yet answered whether American biscuits were made in England, and if so what they were called.
pl

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Dr. Goodword
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Re: Canape

Postby Dr. Goodword » Thu Oct 30, 2014 11:09 pm

I stand corrected and have made the necessary adjustments to reflect the correction. I will change the sound file tomorrow and also take the acute off the E so that people can search for this word without having the E acute.
• The Good Dr. Goodword

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call_copse
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Re: Canape

Postby call_copse » Fri Oct 31, 2014 8:04 am

@Perry I don't think we have a direct analog - quick bit of googling shows them to be something like a bread roll but made like a scone? Not something I know of to be honest. Dumplings yes, scones on say a cobbler but nothing quite like what I am seeing.
Iain

Perry Lassiter
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Re: Canape

Postby Perry Lassiter » Fri Oct 31, 2014 2:06 pm

Biscuits are made with flour, baking powder, then milk or buttermilk, perhaps salt and a couple of other ingredients. One rolls out the dough flat, then cuts into circles with a biscuit cutter, or even the top of a glass. Bake for about 15-20 minutes, then slice sideways to insert butter. There are dozens of variations easily found online. I once got into the kitchen and made several variations until I found something close to what I remember from childhood. The trick was to use about a teaspoon of baking powder plus a quarter to half teaspoon of baking soda to bring out the buttermilk flavor. Plus my personal preference, but I've eaten all sorts of good biscuits. Over here, people often add fruit preserves. Another favorite in the south this to slice them sideways, lay them flat on a plate, and cover with red eye gravy, for which there are also many recipes. It's basically flour and water with a bit of meat broth added for flavor.
pl

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call_copse
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Re: Canape

Postby call_copse » Tue Nov 04, 2014 9:09 am

No, not a feature of life here. They sound intriguing, perhaps I'll give some a try. We can even get buttermilk over here these days. Have you a recommended recipe perhaps? If not I'll just snuffle about on t'webz.

(Note to self - check if snuffle has ever been a good word)
Iain

Philip Hudson
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Re: Canape

Postby Philip Hudson » Tue Nov 04, 2014 11:42 am

The American biscuit and cornpone (cornbread) are the American Southerner's staff of life. My grandpa couldn't go a meal without a bowl of crumbled cornpone doused in cold buttermilk. He lived to be ninety-nine, almost to one-hundred. He was a practical but not a doctrinaire vegetarian. My grandma ate bacon drippings in or on everything she ate, even tossed salad. She cooked separate meals for herself and Grandpa. She lived to be ninety-four. Genes trump diet sometimes. Neither of them would have deigned to eat a canapé. My spell check won't let me spell canape without complaining.
It is dark at night, but the Sun will come up and then we can see.

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Re: CANAPÉ

Postby misterdoe » Fri Aug 19, 2016 4:23 pm

Perry Lassiter wrote:I seldom use the other word because my weird mind wants to say "horse doovers," which only shows my ignorance.


My mother said that, as a teenager, she thought maybe she was being cool in using the word... except she pronounced it "horz devorz." :lol: And on Sanford and Son I recall Fred, who was supposed to be originally from St. Louis, saying "horse divers."

Perry Lassiter
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Re: Canape

Postby Perry Lassiter » Sun Aug 21, 2016 9:16 pm

Hey call_copse, did you ever try a bicuit recipe?
pl

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call_copse
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Re: Canape

Postby call_copse » Mon Aug 22, 2016 7:18 am

@Perry

Not yet. Sadly I get more free time in my coffee break at work than I do at home, busy year so far. Sounds like a nice project to undertake with my son though, who loves cooking. I'll see if I can do that this weekend.
Iain


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