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Latin's descendants

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Postby sluggo » Sat Jan 30, 2010 1:57 pm

saparris wrote:And pay-ee-per is what you write on with a pen, which, or course, rhymes with pin.


I wish I had a dime for every time my Mississippi mother explained to us urchins: "Pin! P-E-N!". She never did use the term "inkpen", which when I finally heard it in Tennessee struck me as woefully redundant :roll:

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Postby beck123 » Sat Jan 30, 2010 2:52 pm

It feels odd being "Junior" folk on this site. Heck, I'm about to run out of clever things to say.
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Postby saparris » Sat Jan 30, 2010 3:48 pm

And so, how does one say the Pepper of Salt and......?


One doesn't.
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Postby LukeJavan8 » Sat Jan 30, 2010 8:23 pm

Yes, even this discussion of Pin/Pen seems somewhat
redundant, having been done before.
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Postby saparris » Sat Jan 30, 2010 9:35 pm

She never did use the term "inkpen"


My mother eats "green salads," drinks "sweet milk," and has sandwiches on "loaf bread."
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Postby saparris » Sat Jan 30, 2010 9:41 pm

It feels odd being "Junior" folk on this site. Heck, I'm about to run out of clever things to say.


Think of it as reincarnation, Junior (a second life, if you will).
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Postby Slava » Sat Jan 30, 2010 9:43 pm

saparris wrote:My mother eats "green salads," drinks "sweet milk," and has sandwiches on "loaf bread."
I agree with your mother on the salad bit. Let's face it, if you can call slop made with mayonnaise, potatoes, and/or macaroni "salad," we need the green for clarity.

Who's going to be the one to post "salad" to the suggestion board?

As bread comes in so many forms, I get the idea of "loaf" bread, too.

I'm a bit at a loss over the "sweet" of the milk, though. I have vague, vapid, thoughts thunking away, but I can't quite get there.
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Postby saparris » Sat Jan 30, 2010 11:01 pm

I understand the green, loaf, and sweet qualifiers, but go to any restaurant, order a salad, and see what they bring you. Bet it won't be macaroni.

And if my mother asks me to bring her some bread from the store (she's elderly and lives with my wife and me), she doesn't expect pitas.

I see your point, but I still think it's funny that she says those things.

FYI, sweet milk is a cousin of buttermilk, a staple in a Southern kitchen.

Oh, and she also calls the thigh of a chicken a short leg.
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Postby beck123 » Sun Jan 31, 2010 9:20 am

Salad is a modern manifestation of "salted." In modern Spanish, the word is "ensalada," which literally means "salted."

I imagine salt was the preferred salad dressing in the days when people spoke Latin.
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Postby saparris » Sun Jan 31, 2010 11:52 am

Which brings a new meaning to the term "salad days": the time before the doctor made you cut out salt.
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Postby LukeJavan8 » Sun Jan 31, 2010 1:24 pm

Loaf bread: my grandmother used to say that, and I
never questioned why. But since she baked rolls
and crescents, she probably made the distinction in
her own mind.

Salad: tuna salad, ham salad, egg salad.
Salt: a staple in all ages: even used as currency upon a time.
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Postby saparris » Sun Jan 31, 2010 1:38 pm

I'll have the chicken salad on...uh...loaf bread.

Hold the Mayo. I don't like clinics.
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Postby LukeJavan8 » Sun Jan 31, 2010 2:03 pm

Pickle on the side?
Your puns should be in a clinic.
They belong in the thread called "Saturday". (he,he!)
There you will meet your match.
I wonder if "loaf" bread meant before it came sliced.
When people baked their own in a loaf pan?
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Postby beck123 » Sun Jan 31, 2010 2:11 pm

My wife and I have always (jokingly) wanted to open a restaurant called "Eaty Gourmet's," and we decided that if we did, the lunch counter would be called the Mayo Clinic. Great minds think alike.
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Postby beck123 » Sun Jan 31, 2010 2:17 pm

LukeJavan8 wrote:Salt: a staple in all ages: even used as currency upon a time.


Yep. That's reflected in the expression, "worth one's salt." It's also where the word "salary" originated.

"Celery," on the other hand (which is terrific in salads, and is one of the few standard vegetables of the European diet that originated in Scandanavia,) has its roots elsewhere.
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