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Soft Drinks: pop, soda, coke, et al

A forum for discussing US dialects (accents).

It's A Coke in Arkansaw

Postby meanjoybug5 » Thu Mar 02, 2006 9:56 am

Raised in Central Arkansas it's always been Coke. No matter the "flavor". I have traveled all over the South---and the variations are sodey pop, cold drink, coke, co-cola, pop, soda, soda pop, pepsi, or just plain drink. Now at our house here in Middle Tennessee--the "Tennessee Pepsi" is very popular. Mix Seagram's 7 and Pepsi, with a fair mount of ice.
FYI- I scored a 99% Dixie rating on the test. I've known for years that I was country as dirt--this just proves my case.

As for "bag balm', as kids it or methylade, iodine or rubbing alcohol were applied as the injury/illness dictated. Also, we were administered sassafrass tea, linament, kerosene with sugar and various other home remedies. My Grandpa Smith was half Indian and my Granny Smith was raised in the Ozarks, explaining the medicinal choices.
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Postby brickredstar » Fri Mar 03, 2006 2:52 am

i'm from central texas, basically of my friends and family call it "soda." we also use "soda water" sometimes. my dad and grandma say "sodey" or "sodey water" though

i once had a teacher from nebraska and she called it "pop", we were all like "what...?"
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Postby jozziejane » Thu Mar 16, 2006 11:44 pm

I am from Chattanooga, Tennessee and I always refer to a soft drink as a "drink." For example, "Let me get something to drink" or "I need a drink." It isn't that complicated here in Chattanooga. We're just laid back southern people who try to do things the easiest way. Around here, that seems to be it. And I was 87% Rebel... Jeez, I need to broaden my horizens.
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Postby Huia Iesou » Fri Mar 17, 2006 11:19 am

Soda.
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Postby chlyn » Sat Mar 18, 2006 12:07 am

Grew up in Massachusetts, where it's "tonic".

Moved to upstate New York, where it's "pop", but pronounced "paaahp". I hate that pronounciation, so I call it soda.

Do people in Massachusetts still say "tonic"? I guess I should look in the grocery store aisle to see what's written on the sign next time I go home.
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Postby R0xyg4l » Sat Mar 18, 2006 2:58 am

I'm from Indiana and we say pop, my husband is from Connecticut and he says soda. Our little one is torn lol. I've also heard my father in law call Sprite the "uncola".
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Postby Brazilian dude » Sat Mar 18, 2006 8:44 am

I've also heard my father in law call Sprite the "uncola".

Oh, for a second I thought he had pursued juridical studies.

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Postby KatyBr » Sat Mar 18, 2006 6:54 pm

BD, the advertising for Sprite began as calling it the uncola. I think it was Sprite or maybe it was it's earlier version, 7up. Sorry, some googling revealed it was the advertizing for 7-up. Oh well you understand the reference now don't you? In fact it was a wonderful commercial with Geoffrey Holder, the tall, dark, young, bald man with the Trinidadian accent who said so memorably "The Un Cooooola.." http://www.dougmacaulay.com/kingspud/sel_by_actor_index_2.php?actor_first=Geoffrey&actor_last=Holder
Sprite is tastier, more twang, just as Coke has more twang than Pepsi, (to me). (Barq calls this twang 'bite'). And there you have it

Kt
I quit drinking 'pop' long ago but the occasional sprite is tasty.
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Postby chlyn » Sat Mar 18, 2006 10:00 pm

I think Brazilian dude saw "father in law" and thought "father, in law [profession]".

Thanks for the "uncola" explanation. Now I remember that great commercial. That guy's voice was outstanding.
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Postby Brazilian dude » Sun Mar 19, 2006 9:43 am

I think Brazilian dude saw "father in law" and thought "father, in law [profession]".

Exactly.

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Postby KatyBr » Sun Mar 19, 2006 9:50 pm

I was wondering why BD, who oc understands all US idioms, becase he was here once, associated uncola wth things Judical, but then I'm pretty sure he hasn't seen those commercials from 1987, due to his tender years back then.

KT
Perhaps father in law was an unfamiliar phrase or just to him unfamilial?
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Postby Brazilian dude » Sun Mar 19, 2006 10:47 pm

I think it's so plain but you guys don't see. It's father-in-law.

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Postby Brazilian dude » Sun Mar 19, 2006 10:48 pm

I was wondering why BD, who oc understands all US idioms, becase he was here once,

That sounds so sarcastic and incorrect. I have been there many many times.

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Postby KatyBr » Sun Mar 19, 2006 11:34 pm

I wasn't being sarcastic, Just trying to be accurate, if I'd said you were here many times and you'd been here once for years That would have been wrong, if I say once, well at least that's accurate. Honest, but think what you like anyway.
:) Just out of curiosity why weren't you upset that I referred to you as too young to have seen the uncola commercial? ( I'm sure we all know it's father in law, or father-in-law. Definately a familial relationship, the non-existant comma notwithstanding. It was a pun, perhaps not as funny as I'd have liked nevertheless...)


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Postby analir » Mon Mar 20, 2006 1:19 am

Howdy Ya'll! Just kidding...I'm from Texas and I figure you expect me to speak like this, huh? <lol> Like most southerners, we do say "Coke" in reference to any kind of soft drink. Some of my family is from Ohio though and I get a kick out of hearing them say "want a pop?".
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