Alphadictionary.com

Our Sponsors

Technical Translation
Website Translation Clip Art
 

talkin' southern

A forum for discussing US dialects (accents).

Postby Stargzer » Wed May 31, 2006 3:35 pm

gailr wrote: . . . "that which does not kill me makes me stranger."

-gailr


She does find the strangest links sometimes . . .
Regards//Larry

"To preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of the people always possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them."
-- Attributed to Richard Henry Lee
User avatar
Stargzer
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 2551
Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2005 3:56 pm
Location: Crownsville, MD

Talkin' Suthern

Postby Huny » Fri Jun 02, 2006 12:01 am

Talk about mixed-nuts-- I was born and raised in beautiful Santa Barbara, CA, by southern parents and grandparents from BOTH sides. They were very proper, so I was raised that way (raised on grits, too). Then, I moved to Georgia and met and married a (these are his words, not mine) true Georgia Boy. Sometimes it's like we talk two different languages in this house. He likes to "grill" his steaks and I "bar-b-que" mine. Just to name a few. He is always telling me to "talk english" ?? It keeps things very funny around here,but I love him for it. Oh, joy, I can hardly wait till we have kids!! Oh, what fun!! Bi-lingual?
"What lies behind us and what lies ahead of us are tiny matters compaired to what lies inside us." R.W.E.
Huny
Lexiterian
 
Posts: 293
Joined: Thu Jun 01, 2006 11:38 pm
Location: Georgia

"ya'll" as addressed...

Postby TIDE-HSV » Wed Jun 21, 2006 12:09 pm

to a single person is a common misunderstanding. When "ya'll" is addressed to a single person, as in "Ya'll come, heanh?" the addressee understands that the invitation is issued to him/her and the whole family. "Yonder," or its variant, "yon" is simply a conservatism which has faded out of Northern dialects. It's still present in German, another conservative lanugage :D, as "jener," pronounced approximately as "yehner."
TIDE-HSV
Junior Lexiterian
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Tue Jun 20, 2006 5:31 pm

Re: Talkin' Suthern

Postby Bailey » Wed Jun 21, 2006 1:04 pm

Huny wrote: He likes to "grill" his steaks and I "bar-b-que" mine.

according to the food network,barbequing is for slow cooking; grilling is quick cooking outdoors, for those of us who just wanna eat yall.
mark
it's traditional for me to 'burn the meat'.

Today is the first day of the rest of your life, Make the most of it...
kb








Bailey
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 2114
Joined: Tue Mar 21, 2006 7:51 pm

Re: Talkin' Suthern

Postby Huny » Fri Jun 23, 2006 12:37 am

Bailey wrote:
Huny wrote: He likes to "grill" his steaks and I "bar-b-que" mine.

according to the food network,barbequing is for slow cooking; grilling is quick cooking outdoors, for those of us who just wanna eat yall.
mark
it's traditional for me to 'burn the meat'.

This is from Dictionary.com.(BTW: I asked some southern friends what they call slow cooking out of doors and they said they called it "smoking" or "smoked meat" usually done in a smoker simular to a barbecue grill only it cooks slower and gives it a "smoked" flavor.)

barbecue

n 1: meat that has been barbecued or grilled in a highly seasoned sauce [syn: barbeque] 2: a cookout in which food is cooked over an open fire; especially a whole animal carcass roasted on a spit [syn: barbeque] 3: a rack to hold meat for cooking over hot charcoal usually out of doors [syn: barbeque] v : cook outdoors on a barbecue grill; "let's barbecue that meat"; "We cooked out in the forest" [syn: cook out]

A grill is what you cook the barbecued meat on, and according to my husband,ours is on fire as we speak..... :shock: I hope he didn't mistake our wiener-dog
for a hot dog!!!
Gotta go!!
"What lies behind us and what lies ahead of us are tiny matters compaired to what lies inside us." R.W.E.
Huny
Lexiterian
 
Posts: 293
Joined: Thu Jun 01, 2006 11:38 pm
Location: Georgia

Re: talkin' southern

Postby Ferrus » Sat Dec 30, 2006 2:58 pm

Bailey wrote:Only a Southerner can show or point out to you the general direction of "yonder."

I had no idea anyone still used this. Reminds me of 'Good King Wenceslas', 'Yonder peasant, who is he?'
Ferrus
Junior Lexiterian
 
Posts: 99
Joined: Wed Nov 29, 2006 8:33 pm
Location: Birmingham, UK

Postby Perry » Sat Dec 30, 2006 6:38 pm

Yonder is practically standard usage in these h'yar parts. :wink:
"Time is nature's way of keeping everything from happening all at once. Lately it hasn't been working."
Anonymous
User avatar
Perry
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 2306
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 9:50 am
Location: Asheville, NC

Postby skinem » Sat Dec 30, 2006 8:12 pm

Perry wrote:Yonder is practically standard usage in these h'yar parts. :wink:


Yup. Here, too. Definitely not obsolete here, even among the educated.
User avatar
skinem
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1197
Joined: Thu Apr 27, 2006 4:33 pm
Location: Middle Tennessee

Postby Bailey » Sun Dec 31, 2006 1:40 am

And yet right after telling us our destination is over yonder they say, "But you can't get there from here."

mark Oy-Vey Bailey

Today is the first day of the rest of your life, Make the most of it...
kb








Bailey
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 2114
Joined: Tue Mar 21, 2006 7:51 pm

Postby sluggo » Sun Dec 31, 2006 3:24 pm

Bailey wrote:And yet right after telling us our destination is over yonder they say, "But you can't get there from here."

mark Oy-Vey Bailey


I think of that as a Maineiac expression.
Stop! Murder us not, tonsured rumpots! Knife no one, fink!
sluggo
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1476
Joined: Wed Apr 12, 2006 1:58 pm
Location: Carolinia Agrestícia: The Forest Primeval

Re: talkin' southern

Postby Stargzer » Sun Dec 31, 2006 4:49 pm

Ferrus wrote:
Bailey wrote:Only a Southerner can show or point out to you the general direction of "yonder."

I had no idea anyone still used this. Reminds me of 'Good King Wenceslas', 'Yonder peasant, who is he?'


Aye, laddie; some o' us provincials are not as au courant as our progenitors on that wee sma' isle off o' the coast o' Pas-de-Calais. :wink:
Regards//Larry

"To preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of the people always possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them."
-- Attributed to Richard Henry Lee
User avatar
Stargzer
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 2551
Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2005 3:56 pm
Location: Crownsville, MD

Postby scw1217 » Wed Jan 31, 2007 4:03 pm

Putting in my 2 cents (a little late perhaps), BBQ is chicken or pork and served with BBQ sauce. Steak is grilled.

Yonder is used frequently here, and since my grandparents were farmers all their lives, I do know how much a "mess" is.
Suzanne Williams is a native Floridian, wife, and mother, with a penchant for spelling anything, who happens to love photography.
User avatar
scw1217
Lexiterian
 
Posts: 258
Joined: Mon Sep 26, 2005 7:50 am
Location: Florida, USA

Postby Palewriter » Wed Jan 31, 2007 9:26 pm

scw1217 wrote:Putting in my 2 cents (a little late perhaps), BBQ is chicken or pork and served with BBQ sauce. Steak is grilled.



A slab of brisket, barbecued slowly over a mixture of mesquite and apple woods, makes a mighty convincing case for beef BBQ. And a plain roast (or grilled) chicken or piece of pork with BBQ sauce poured on it certainly wouldn't get five culinary stars in Texas.

Our butcher takes chickens and applies a dry BBQ rub, the exact recipe for which he won't divulge under threat, and then smokes them for about 12 hours over a VERY slow fire indeed. Don't need any sauce at all with those suckers.

On the other hand, a steak (on the grill) is something that I have to take care of myself. Suffice it to say: 1.5 inch thick Prime ribeye, four minutes each side over glowing fire, allow to rest for another four minutes while I conjure up a nice Caesar salad and a glass of Merlot. Life is good.

-- PW



-- PW
"Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention to arrive safely in a pretty and well-preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming: Wow!!! What a ride!"
Palewriter
Lexiterian
 
Posts: 291
Joined: Sat Apr 09, 2005 11:59 pm

Postby scw1217 » Wed Jan 31, 2007 9:55 pm

You are making me hungry, Palewriter! The best BBQ in the south (my opinion) is right next door to me. No joke. The smell gets you on the weekends (which is when they are open).
Suzanne Williams is a native Floridian, wife, and mother, with a penchant for spelling anything, who happens to love photography.
User avatar
scw1217
Lexiterian
 
Posts: 258
Joined: Mon Sep 26, 2005 7:50 am
Location: Florida, USA

Re: talkin' southern

Postby Ferrus » Thu Feb 01, 2007 2:16 pm

Stargzer wrote:Aye, laddie; some o' us provincials are not as au courant as our progenitors on that wee sma' isle off o' the coast o' Pas-de-Calais. :wink:

'Aye', 'laddie' 'wee' and 'o'' are all Scottish expressions I'm afraid. Well some are used in North England.

The Scots, Northern English and Southern American dialects appear to be the most conservative forms of the language. Most be something to do with speaking to farm animals all day.
Ferrus
Junior Lexiterian
 
Posts: 99
Joined: Wed Nov 29, 2006 8:33 pm
Location: Birmingham, UK

PreviousNext

Return to The Rebel-Yankee Test

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google Adsense [Bot] and 2 guests

cron