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Rebel-Yankee on Charleston, SC News Tonight

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Rebel-Yankee on Charleston, SC News Tonight

Postby Dr. Goodword » Thu Jun 29, 2006 4:48 pm

Live 5 news [Charleston, SC] went out and found out how people in Charleston did on the alphaDictionary Rebel (Dixie)-Yankee test. The results might surprise you. Watch the video to see how they did on the test. You might also be surprised to find out how Live 5 News' own Amanda Fitzpatrick and Rob Youngblood scored. [The newscast was taken down.]
Last edited by Dr. Goodword on Sat Jul 08, 2006 11:49 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby GoCat » Sat Jul 01, 2006 9:58 pm

Did anyone else notice that Miss Newscaster kept referring to "Dixen" instead of "Dixie"? Was that just her mispronunciation? I've never heard anyone in all my life say Dixen. And she is supposedly from the South!

:shock:
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Postby Stargzer » Sat Jul 01, 2006 11:02 pm

GoCat wrote:Did anyone else notice that Miss Newscaster kept referring to "Dixen" instead of "Dixie"? Was that just her mispronunciation? I've never heard anyone in all my life say Dixen. And she is supposedly from the South!

:shock:


I thought she was saying "Dixan" as an adjectival form of "Dixie" (which in turn is taken from Mason and Dixon, the surveyors of Mason and Dixon's Line, the border between Maryland and Pennsylvania and between Maryland and Delaware). I'd never heard before either, but then, I'm not from that far south. However, if you study the geography of the Civil War, you'll see why there was no way on God's green Earth that the North was about to let Maryland secede.
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Postby GoCat » Mon Jul 03, 2006 1:59 pm

Stargzer wrote:I thought she was saying "Dixan" as an adjectival form of "Dixie"


That's what I initially thought. She used it nearly every time. Just thought it sounded funny since in everything I've ever read pertaining to Dixie or anyone I've ever known from across the South, not once have I seen or heard it referred to as such.

:roll:
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Postby sluggo » Tue Jul 04, 2006 10:43 pm

GoCat wrote:Did anyone else notice that Miss Newscaster kept referring to "Dixen" instead of "Dixie"? Was that just her mispronunciation? I've never heard anyone in all my life say Dixen. And she is supposedly from the South!

:shock:


Was it something like Dixie-an, i.e. an adjective? The video link doesn't seem to work :cry:
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Postby Huny » Wed Jul 05, 2006 1:15 am

GoCat wrote:Did anyone else notice that Miss Newscaster kept referring to "Dixen" instead of "Dixie"? Was that just her mispronunciation? I've never heard anyone in all my life say Dixen. And she is supposedly from the South!

:shock:


Maybe she was just hoping to get Christmas in July by saying "Dixen". Maybe It would have worked if she had asked for the one with the red nose instead. :wink: BTW: I couldn't get the link to work either.
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Postby GoCat » Wed Jul 05, 2006 10:37 am

Huny wrote:Maybe she was just hoping to get Christmas in July by saying "Dixen". Maybe It would have worked if she had asked for the one with the red nose instead. :wink: BTW: I couldn't get the link to work either.


:lol: Uh, no, Huny, I don't think that was it! :wink:

No, she wasn't saying Dixie-an. It was cleary Dixen. I thought at any moment that her co-anchor would correct her but he never did. Maybe off the air.

:roll:
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Postby Stargzer » Wed Jul 05, 2006 6:10 pm

The way newscasters wander from job to job, she may have been from the South: Southern Canada.
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Postby gailr » Thu Jul 06, 2006 12:57 am

I thought she did a fair job with the footage of "Dixon" speech. Too bad they didn't give her any examples of "Mason" for comparison. {Rimshot}

I enjoyed the link, though; thanks for posting it, Dr. Goodword. This promotion may net some screaming linguistic groupies, yet. Hopefully, they won't casually misuse adverbs...

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Postby tcward » Fri Jul 07, 2006 4:14 pm

Apparently the new link has removed the '/state' subdirectory...

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Postby Bailey » Fri Jul 07, 2006 7:41 pm

The Dixon was adjectival she always used it as a qualifier not a destination, I think she was hypercorrecting and it sounded silly.

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