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crudivorism

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crudivorism

Postby Brazilian dude » Fri Jul 29, 2005 5:25 pm

Since I can't suffer cooked vegetables, I resort to crudivorism every now and then.

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Postby KatyBr » Fri Jul 29, 2005 7:44 pm

I was checking the 'net for definitions but all I ran across was information on how risky eating raw vegetation is, but I disagree I think it's the canning lobby that puts that out, a good washing should remove pesticides and perfringens, also e.coli.

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Postby Brazilian dude » Sat Jul 30, 2005 11:45 am

As far as I know, crudivorism is only the habit of eating raw things, instead of cooking them. I learned this word first in Portuguese - crudivorismo - and looked to see if there was a corresponding form in English.

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Postby Stargzer » Sat Jul 30, 2005 3:08 pm

KatyBr wrote:I was checking the 'net for definitions but all I ran across was information on how risky eating raw vegetation is, but I disagree I think it's the canning lobby that puts that out, a good washing should remove pesticides and perfringens, also e.coli.

Kt


It sounds like a crudivore is one who eats crud! :D

Merriam-Websert Online Dicitonary

Main Entry: [sup]1[/sup]crude
Pronunciation: 'krüd

Function: adjective
Inflected Form(s): crud·er; crud·est

Etymology: Middle English, from Latin crudus raw, crude, undigested -- more at RAW

1 : existing in a natural state and unaltered by cooking or processing <crude oil>

2 archaic : UNRIPE, IMMATURE

3 : marked by the primitive, gross, or elemental or by uncultivated simplicity or vulgarity <a crude stereotype>

4 : rough or inexpert in plan or execution <a crude shelter>

5 : lacking a covering, glossing, or concealing element : OBVIOUS <crude facts>

6 : tabulated without being broken down into classes <the crude death rate>
synonym see RUDE
- crude·ly adverb
- crude·ness noun



From the Provence Cookbook by Patricia Wells:

Cru: raw.
Crudité: raw vegetable.


Some plant foods do need to be cooked in two changes of water; simple rinsing is not enough.

From Wilderness Survival

. . .
WARNING

The critical factor in using plants for food is to avoid accidental poisoning. Eat only those plants you can positively identify and you know are safe to eat.


Absolutely identify plants before using them as food. Poison hemlock has killed people who mistook it for its relatives, wild carrots and wild parsnips.

At times you may find yourself in a situation for which you could not plan. In this instance you may not have had the chance to learn the plant life of the region in which you must survive. In this case you can use the Universal Edibility Test to determine which plants you can eat and those to avoid.

It is important to be able to recognize both cultivated and wild edible plants in a survival situation. Most of the information in this chapter is directed towards identifying wild plants because information relating to cultivated plants is more readily available. [/b]

. . .

WARNING

Do not eat mushrooms in a survival situation! The only way to tell if a mushroom is edible is by positive identification. There is no room for experimentation. Symptoms of the most dangerous mushrooms affecting the central nervous system may show up after several days have passed when it is too late to reverse their effects.

. . .

Preparation of Plant Food
Although some plants or plant parts are edible raw, you must cook others to be edible or palatable. Edible means that a plant or food will provide you with necessary nutrients, while palatable means that it actually is pleasing to eat. Many wild plants are edible but barely palatable. It is a good idea to learn to identify, prepare, and eat wild foods.

Methods used to improve the taste of plant food include soaking, boiling, cooking, or leaching. Leaching is done by crushing the food (for example, acorns), placing it in a strainer, and pouring boiling water through it or immersing it in running water.

Boil leaves, stems, and buds until tender, changing the water, if necessary, to remove any bitterness.

Boil, bake, or roast tubers and roots. Drying helps to remove caustic oxalates from some roots like those in the Arum family.

Leach acorns in water, if necessary, to remove the bitterness. Some nuts, such as chestnuts, are good raw, but taste better roasted.

You can eat many grains and seeds raw until they mature. When hard or dry, you may have to boil or grind them into meal or flour.

The sap from many trees, such as maples, birches, walnuts, and sycamores, contains sugar. You may boil these saps down to a syrup for sweetening. It takes about 35 liters of maple sap to make one liter of maple syrup!


Or, as the Boy Scout Fieldbook once said, there are many poisonous plants, but almost anything that walks, creeps, crawls, slithers, or flies is safe to eat.
Regards//Larry

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Postby Brazilian dude » Sat Jul 30, 2005 5:06 pm

Portuguese/Catalan: cru
Spanish/Italian: crudo
Romanian: crud

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Postby Brazilian dude » Sat Jul 30, 2005 5:09 pm

Do not eat mushrooms in a survival situation!

I wouldn't even eat them under normal circumstances. Yucky toadstools!

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Postby KatyBr » Sat Jul 30, 2005 6:44 pm

Stargzer wrote:WARNING

Do not eat mushrooms in a survival situation! The only way to tell if a mushroom is edible is by positive identification. There is no room for experimentation. Symptoms of the most dangerous mushrooms affecting the central nervous system may show up after several days have passed when it is too late to reverse their effects.


What rubbish, first I was referring to fresh foods from a grocery store, and second micology is not that terribly difficult to learn, I ate wild mushrooms while I was spending the summer on the grizzly bear reserve. I had two books and compared what I saw with the descriptions and pictures, I'm still hale and hearty, that was over twenty years ago. well I'm still alive.....

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Postby Stargzer » Sun Jul 31, 2005 1:23 am

KatyBr wrote:
Stargzer wrote:WARNING

Do not eat mushrooms in a survival situation! The only way to tell if a mushroom is edible is by positive identification. There is no room for experimentation. . . .


What rubbish, first I was referring to fresh foods from a grocery store, and second micology is not that terribly difficult to learn, I ate wild mushrooms while I was spending the summer on the grizzly bear reserve. I had two books and compared what I saw with the descriptions and pictures, I'm still hale and hearty, that was over twenty years ago. well I'm still alive.....

kt


Exactly--you had two books so you could compare gill prints and other things: you were not in a survival situation. Unless you have the experience, do not try that in a survival situation. I learned to recognize "inky caps" once long ago on a mushroom hike led by a mycologist on Theodore Roosevelt Island in the Potomac. I think I might still recognize them, but I wouldn't try anything else I found in the wild.

But ahh, stuffed mushrooms, mushroom pizza, mushies in Chinese food, . . . ambrosia on a par with oysters--fried steamed, or on the half-shell--or steamed crabs!

I agree you should always wash fresh veggies, unless they are in a package that says no washing is needed, like some salad mixes.
Regards//Larry

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Postby Stargzer » Sun Jul 31, 2005 1:45 am

Brazilian dude wrote:
Do not eat mushrooms in a survival situation!

I wouldn't even eat them under normal circumstances. Yucky toadstools!

Brazilian dude


I'm reminded of a book I never read but saw in the science library at college lo these many years ago. It sounded like a bad sci-fi movie: The Advance of the Fungi! :) It does sound like an interesting read, though.
Regards//Larry

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Postby anders » Sun Jul 31, 2005 3:43 am

I know almost nothing of mushrooms. There are just some three or four species that I would dare to try without a reference book. My sisters are much better at it, and regularily find for example heaps of chanterelles. Ceps are great, but I've found, fortunately not the hard way, that when I find something like them, it turns out to be the extremely bitter variety, one of which can spoil a whole mushroom casserole.

As to inky caps, they aren't too bad, but never, ever try them together with alcohol!
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Postby KatyBr » Sun Jul 31, 2005 12:49 pm

Stargzer wrote:
KatyBr wrote:
Stargzer wrote:

kt


Exactly--you had two books so you could compare gill prints and other things: you were not in a survival situation. Unless you have the experience, do not try that in a survival situation. I learned to recognize "inky caps" once long ago on a mushroom hike led by a mycologist on Theodore Roosevelt Island in the Potomac. I think I might still recognize them, but I wouldn't try anything else I found in the wild.
living in a tent in grizzly country Was survival mode, my books always went with me, as survival gear.

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Postby Stargzer » Sun Jul 31, 2005 10:39 pm

KatyBr wrote:living in a tent in grizzly country Was survival mode, my books always went with me, as survival gear.

kt


Well, it was by choice and you were prepared with books. True suvival mode is when you end up there unprepared and have to survive with only your wits and maybe a tool or two.
Regards//Larry

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Postby Stargzer » Sun Jul 31, 2005 10:42 pm

anders wrote: . . . As to inky caps, they aren't too bad, but never, ever try them together with alcohol!


We never did try them, it was just a hike we went on with a guide long ago, BK (Before Kids).

But . . . what does the alcohol do? Turn them into Magic Mushrooms? Not that I'd have any handy in a survival situation, anyway. :)
Regards//Larry

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Postby anders » Mon Aug 01, 2005 7:26 am

Ever heard of antabus? The reaction of the body is very similar.
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Postby Brazilian dude » Mon Aug 01, 2005 12:47 pm

I would never board such a vehicle knowing that I would sooner or later feel inexplicable formication.

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