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titubant

Use this forum to suggest Good Words for Professor Beard.

titubant

Postby sardith » Mon Oct 10, 2011 2:24 pm

titubant: A disturbance of body equilibrium in standing or walking, resulting in an uncertain gait and trembling.

Byron did something of the kind in Don Juan; and the world at large is still quivering and titubant under the shock of his appeal.
-- W. E. Henley, "The Secret of Wordsworth," The Pall Mall Magazine, Volume 30, 1903

What a terrific word, but unlike the influence of someone as romantic and charming as Don Juan, this is EXACTLY how I would describe the feeling I get when I exit an elevator! :roll:

(That would evidence still quivering semicircular canals, I believe.)

Regardless, I would love to see an article on this scarcely seen word.

Sardith :)
“The difference between the right word and the almost right word is the difference between lightning and a lightning bug.”
~Mark Twain, [pen name for Samuel Clemens], American author and humorist, (1835-1910)~
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Postby Perry Lassiter » Mon Oct 10, 2011 3:23 pm

Akin to the feeling in my knees when I stand a long time without shifting my weight. Comes from 35 yrs of diabetes that induced a form of neuropathy that affects my balance.
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titubant

Postby Audiendus » Fri Oct 21, 2011 7:46 am

This word (= "staggering" or "reeling") seems to be much more common in French than in English.
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Postby Perry Lassiter » Fri Oct 21, 2011 4:25 pm

Surprisingly titillating discussion.
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Postby Slava » Fri Oct 21, 2011 8:32 pm

The first thing that came to my mind when I read the definition was the idea of a sailor coming ashore after a goodly time at sea. They tend to stagger, as their "sea legs" aren't accustomed to the steadiness of solid land.

I think there's another word for this, but I can't come up with it at the moment. Can anyone else who's read Hornblower and/or Bolitho clue me in?
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Postby Perry Lassiter » Fri Oct 21, 2011 10:42 pm

-Going on board, one has to get "their sea legs." Not sure whether one refers to "land legs." Someone reading this may have been in the Navy.
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