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Percribrate

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Percribrate

Postby Grogie » Fri Jul 26, 2013 8:15 pm

To pass through a sieve. ''After pasta is cooked it must be percribrated.''
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Re: Percribrate

Postby gailr » Fri Jul 26, 2013 8:57 pm

Thank you, Grogie!
I shall take this word unto my fellow Pastafarians. :wink:
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Re: Percribrate

Postby Perry Lassiter » Fri Jul 26, 2013 10:58 pm

I perceive I shall wish the both a fare thee well for the evening.
pl
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Re: Percribrate

Postby Philip Hudson » Sat Jul 27, 2013 12:04 am

I have heard that The Pastafarian Bishop wears a Holy Colander for a mitre.
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Re: Percribrate

Postby gailr » Sat Jul 27, 2013 1:53 pm

There are no clerical ranks, except for those chosen for internet usernames. A few pastafarians have worn colanders for driver's licenses; however earnestly they declare themselves to the local governing board, this is taking the mickey out of exemptions for religious headgear in ID photos. All the cool kids prefer pirate hats (if full pirate regalia is not feasible for the occasion).
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Re: Percribrate

Postby Philip Hudson » Sat Jul 27, 2013 5:19 pm

Gail: "Taking the mickey out" is a new idiom for me. I understand it has been around a long time. I get the Irish jibe here, but don't know whether it gets my Irish up or puts my Irish down. I think this may be an important distinction.
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Re: Percribrate

Postby Slava » Sat Jul 27, 2013 8:40 pm

Philip Hudson wrote:Gail: "Taking the mickey out" is a new idiom for me. I understand it has been around a long time. I get the Irish jibe here, but don't know whether it gets my Irish up or puts my Irish down. I think this may be an important distinction.
For what it's worth, here is an attempt at explaining where "take the mickey" comes from.
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Re: Percribrate

Postby Philip Hudson » Sat Jul 27, 2013 11:42 pm

So, "Take the mickey" is Cockney, not anti-Irish! I assume my taking the mickey would be putting my Irish down. I like Cockneys and the Irish. Irish ancestry I have; Cockney, not that I know of. I don't think Cockneys had been invented when my English ancestors came to America in the early 1600s. I told a Cockney the etymology of the word once and I think he wanted me to take the mickey, because he had plans for me that included violence to my person. I was glad we were on the Internet and he was in Australia. Can I help it if Cockney means Cocks egg?
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Re: Percribrate

Postby Perry Lassiter » Sun Jul 28, 2013 4:42 pm

Gayle, I wonder if MTC might include an entry for Pastafarians in his Apochrypha?
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Re: Percribrate

Postby Philip Hudson » Sun Jul 28, 2013 7:24 pm

It is hard to take Pastafarians seriously. But we do have freedom of religion in the USA.
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Re: Percribrate

Postby call_copse » Mon Jul 29, 2013 8:40 am

Slava wrote:
Philip Hudson wrote:Gail: "Taking the mickey out" is a new idiom for me. I understand it has been around a long time. I get the Irish jibe here, but don't know whether it gets my Irish up or puts my Irish down. I think this may be an important distinction.
For what it's worth, here is an attempt at explaining where "take the mickey" comes from.


Interesting explanation. I have never, ever come across the Mickey Bliss thing though so find this unlikely - I have heard the micturation version many times from many sources. Of course it may be a retro fitted etymology.

Many variants abound for example the more considered and roundabout 'extracting the Michael' - perhaps a bowdlerisation of a euphemism, or maybe just a humourous circumlocution?

According to the interwebz, the cockney designation has been used since 1362. However it was not reclaimed as a self-affixed label until nearer the 1600s. Best not to explain that it originally meant an effeminate gentleman to modern cockneys, who are likely to take offence.
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Re: Percribrate

Postby gailr » Mon Jul 29, 2013 2:22 pm

Philip Hudson wrote:It is hard to take Pastafarians seriously. But we do have freedom of religion in the USA.

Then you are in good company. I would be concerned if I thought my fellow Pastafarians took seriously anything other than the value of a good education -- and that is the whole point.
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Re: Percribrate

Postby Slava » Mon Jul 29, 2013 2:38 pm

Grogie wrote:To pass through a sieve. ''After pasta is cooked it must be percribrated.''
After all this time, I've only just noticed that the example sentence is a bit off.

If you were to pass cooked pasta through a sieve, wouldn't you end up with mush? It's the water that gets sieved, no?
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Re: Percribrate

Postby Perry Lassiter » Mon Jul 29, 2013 4:58 pm

Good point that raises a question. The definition might imply that when one percibrates the pasta, one is removing the water, not mushing up the pasta. Or it might not. Let us all form a circle and contemplate this wonder. Ommmm.
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Re: Percribrate

Postby Philip Hudson » Mon Jul 29, 2013 11:07 pm

True, it is the water that passes through the sieve when pasta is percribrated, not the pasta.

However, sieves may be used in the opposite manner. Food is pushed through sieves for sifting,ricing, or puréeing. My mother never heard of a sieve although she had several. in Red Neck land a sieve is a strainer. Mother's sieves included cheesecloth sieves for making cottage cheese, screen wire sieves for blanching vegetables for freezing, flour sifters that had a little arm inside it to stir the flour, Purée-ers that are conical and have what looks like half a rolling pin that is used to press the food through the holes, a lemon sieve in which a cut lemon is placed and only the juice comes out, a tea sieve which totally surrounds the tea leaves taking the place of a teabag when using loose tea, etc., ad infinitum. Ommmm.
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