Alphadictionary.com

Our Sponsors

Technical Translation
Website Translation Clip Art
 

taikonaut (yuhangyuan)

Use this forum to suggest Good Words for Professor Beard.

taikonaut (yuhangyuan)

Postby Stargzer » Mon Oct 10, 2005 12:39 pm

taikonaut (yuhangyuan)

With China about to launch its second manned space mission as early as 2005-10-13, this is a timely GWOTD.

Quoting from the AP:

"State media say the launch might happen Thursday - almost exactly two years after the first Chinese manned space mission in 2003 - but the date hasn't been confirmed by the government."


AP Article:
http://apnews.excite.com/article/200510 ... 75GG0.html

An earilier AP article use the word "taikonaut" which I looked up in Wikipedia:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astronaut

Quoting from the Wikipedia article:

Taikonaut is sometimes used in English for astronauts from China by Western news media. The term was coined in May 1998 by Chiew Lee Yih from Malaysia, who used it first in newsgroups. Almost simultaneously, Chen Lan coined it for use in the Western media based on the term tàikōng (太空), Chinese for space. In Chinese itself, however, a single term yǔháng yuán (宇航員, "universe navigator") has long been used for astronauts and cosmonauts. The closest term using taikong is a colloquialism tàikōng rén (太空人, "space human") which refers to people who have actually been in space. Official English text issued by the Chinese government uses astronaut.


We wish our space-faring brethren a heart-felt "Godspeed!" even though they may be atheists. :wink:
Regards//Larry

"To preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of the people always possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them."
-- Attributed to Richard Henry Lee
User avatar
Stargzer
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 2546
Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2005 3:56 pm
Location: Crownsville, MD

Postby M. Henri Day » Fri Nov 25, 2005 3:22 pm

Perhaps it was your connexions with the Man Upstairs that got them back safely, Larry ! We'll have to see how it works out if they attempt, as rumour would have it, to send a man to the moon in 2017....

Henri
曾记否,到中流击水,浪遏飞舟?
M. Henri Day
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1142
Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2005 8:24 am
Location: Stockholm, SVERIGE

Postby Brazilian dude » Fri Nov 25, 2005 3:30 pm

I'd like to know how fare could be used as eat or drink. That reminds me of Japanese いただく (itadaku).

Brazilian dude
Languages rule!
Brazilian dude
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1464
Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2005 3:31 pm
Location: Botucatu - SP Brazil

Postby M. Henri Day » Fri Nov 25, 2005 3:51 pm

Good question, BD ! Seems to me like an extended usage of the basic meaning «to travel» or «to cross». Without good fare, we do not fare well. The Japanese «戴く» (Flam will disapprove, aber ich kan nicht anders. Got helffe mir.) has the basic meaning «to receive», thus its use before dining....

Henri
曾记否,到中流击水,浪遏飞舟?
M. Henri Day
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1142
Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2005 8:24 am
Location: Stockholm, SVERIGE

Postby Brazilian dude » Fri Nov 25, 2005 3:56 pm

has the basic meaning «to receive», thus its use before dining

Right.

Brazilian dude
Languages rule!
Brazilian dude
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1464
Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2005 3:31 pm
Location: Botucatu - SP Brazil

Postby Flaminius » Sat Nov 26, 2005 9:38 am

M. Henri Day wrote:The Japanese «戴く» (Flam will disapprove, aber ich kan nicht anders. Got helffe mir.) has the basic meaning «to receive», thus its use before dining....


Nihil obstāt, Henricī, dē litterā sericae vetere. 個人的には、貴方の尚古癖に敬意を表するを禁じえない! sed significationī fundāmentī sunt addendi commendarii.

いただく has a nominal derivation いただき (hilltop; most commonly represented as 頂き), which retains an older and more basic meaning. The basic meaning of 戴く is, to the best of my knowledge, to place something upon oneself. 「雪を頂くアンデス」 is an illustration of this usage.

Pre-meal greeting 「いただきます」 is literally to receive food at above one's head, capturing respectful gesture of acquiring the subsistance. In modern Japanese, いただく is generally understood as an act of receiving with humility but sometimes used as a mechanical replacement for "to eat".

.היסברתי את הכל

And them cat's paws and dromedary's calluses in addition to chicken scratch, 它使我糊涂. Vai tu nesaproti ko es saku?

Flam
Last edited by Flaminius on Sat Nov 26, 2005 11:48 am, edited 1 time in total.
Flaminius
Lexiterian
 
Posts: 408
Joined: Fri Feb 18, 2005 4:36 am

Postby Brazilian dude » Sat Nov 26, 2005 11:48 am

Vai tu nesaproti ko es saku?

Which language is this?

Brazilian dude
Languages rule!
Brazilian dude
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1464
Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2005 3:31 pm
Location: Botucatu - SP Brazil

Postby Flaminius » Sat Nov 26, 2005 11:50 am

latviešu valoda.
Flaminius
Lexiterian
 
Posts: 408
Joined: Fri Feb 18, 2005 4:36 am

Postby Brazilian dude » Sat Nov 26, 2005 12:33 pm

Cool.

Brazilian dude
Languages rule!
Brazilian dude
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1464
Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2005 3:31 pm
Location: Botucatu - SP Brazil


Return to Good Word Suggestions

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests