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pie

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pie

Postby KatyBr » Sun Oct 16, 2005 6:29 pm

pie1 (pī)
n.
A baked food composed of a pastry shell filled with fruit, meat, cheese, or other ingredients, and usually covered with a pastry crust.
A layer cake having cream, custard, or jelly filling.
A whole that can be shared: “That would . . . enlarge the economic pie by making the most productive use of every investment dollar” (New York Times).
idiom:
pie in the sky

An empty wish or promise: “To outlaw deficits . . . is pie in the sky” (Howard H. Baker, Jr.).

[Middle English.]


pie2 (pī)
n.
See magpie (sense 1).

[Middle English, from Old French, from Latin pīca.]


pie3 (pī)
n.
A monetary unit formerly in use in India and Pakistan.

[Hindi pā'ī, from Sanskrit pādikā, quarter, from pāt, pad-, foot, leg.]


pie4 (pī)
n.
An almanac of services used in the English church before the Reformation.

[Medieval Latin pīca.]


pie5 (pī)
n. & v. Printing.
Variant of pi2.






Encyclopedia
pie, meat, fish, fowl, fruit, or vegetables baked with a crust of pastry, or pastry shells filled with custard or pudding. The pies of the Romans, especially at banquets in the days of the empire, were often elaborate concoctions, such as the showpieces in which were enclosed live birds. In England meat and fish pies had become common by the 14th cent., and fruit pies, often called tarts, by the 16th cent. The mince pie was an important feature of the Christmas festivities and was called “superstitious” pie by the Puritans in protest against what seemed to them a pagan manner of celebrating a holy feast. The mincemeat filling was a finely chopped, cooked mixture including raisins, currants, apples, suet, sugar, spice, and often meat, brandy or cider, candied peel, and other ingredients. The English settlers in North America retained their taste for pie and adapted it to their new conditions, creating the pumpkin and the cranberry pies. Pie has remained a popular dessert in the United States. In Italy, pie, or pizza, consists, in its most basic form, of a spread of dough covered with tomatoes and mozzarella cheese and baked in an oven.

from www.answers.com




see more at The first pies, called "coffins" or "coffyns" were savory meat pies with the crusts or pastry being tall, straight-sided with sealed-on floors and lids. Open-crust pastry (not tops or lids) were known as "traps." These pies held assorted meats and sauce components and were baked more like a modern casserole with no pan (the crust itself was the pan, its pastry tough and inedible). The purpose of a pastry shell was mainly to serve as a storage container and serving vessel, and these are often too hard to actually eat. A small pie was known as a tartlet and a tart was a large, shallow open pie (this is still the definition in England). Since pastry was a staple ingredient in medieval menus, pastry making was taken for granted by the majority of early cookbooks, and recipes are not usually included. It wasn't until the 16th century that cookbooks with pastry ingredients began appearing. Historian believe this was because cookbooks started appearing for the general household and not just for professional cooks.


Kt
enjoy the whole article.
KatyBr
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Postby gailr » Mon Oct 17, 2005 10:33 pm

Perhaps all those recipes will inspire the rest of us to make the pie higher.
-gailr :lol:
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