fisticuffs

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KatyBr
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fisticuffs

Postby KatyBr » Thu Oct 27, 2005 8:12 pm

fist·i·cuffs (fĭs'tĭ-kŭfs')
pl.n.
A fistfight.
The activity of fighting with the fists.
[From fisty cuffs : fisty, with the fists (from FIST) + CUFF2.]

fist'i·cuff'er n.




Thesaurus
fisticuffs

noun

A physical conflict involving two or more: fight, fistfight, scrap2, scuffle, tussle. Slang rumble. See conflict/cooperation.




WordNet
Note: click on a word meaning below to see its connections and related words.
The noun fisticuffs has 2 meanings:

Meaning #1: a fight with bare fists
Synonyms: fistfight, slugfest


Meaning #2: fighting with the fists
Synonyms: boxing, pugilism







Translations
Translations for: Fisticuffs
Nederlands (Dutch)
vuistgevecht

Français (French)
bagarre


Deutsch (German)
n. pl. - Faustkampf


Ελληνική (Greek)
n. pl. γρονθοπατινάδα

Italiano (Italian)
pugilato, scazzottatura


Português (Portuguese)
n. pl. - algemas (f pl)


Русский (Russian)
кулачный бой

Español (Spanish)
n. pl. - puñada, puñetazo, golpazo, trompada


Svenska (Swedish)
n. pl. - knytnävskamp



עברית‬ (Hebrew)
n. pl. - ‮קרב אגרופים, התאגרפות‬

from
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Kt

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Postby Brazilian dude » Fri Oct 28, 2005 8:56 am

Português (Portuguese)
n. pl. - algemas (f pl)

This one is wrong. Algemas means handcuffs. Equivalent to fisticuffs I can think of would be briga, peleja, pugna, and combate.

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Spiff
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Postby Spiff » Fri Oct 28, 2005 11:14 am

"Vuistgevecht", I don't know. It exists (I checked it in Van Dale) and the meaning is obvious, but I probably wouldn't use it. Would you, Frank? I prefer the elegantly constructed "handgemeen".
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tcward
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Postby tcward » Fri Oct 28, 2005 6:23 pm

I would expect "vuistgevecht" to be a more literal translation of English "fistfight" -- which is different than fisticuffs when you get down to it. ;)

-Tim

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FISTICUFF

Postby Dr. Goodword » Thu Nov 03, 2005 2:54 pm

There are not many words like this in English with the "i" between two constituents of a compound. Another is handiwork. Can anyone think of another? It might be worth doing this one as an excuse to examine its unusual structure.
• The Good Dr. Goodword

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Stargzer
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Re: FISTICUFF

Postby Stargzer » Thu Nov 03, 2005 7:44 pm

Dr. Goodword wrote:There are not many words like this in English with the "i" between two constituents of a compound. Another is handiwork. Can anyone think of another? It might be worth doing this one as an excuse to examine its unusual structure.


Is the "i" just a substitute for the "y" in "handy?" (handy-work)

I also found this:

Imaginary
The archetypal Scotsman, subject of thousands of jokes all around the world. He is a miser, a mean skunk and a fisty person, who never fails to act against common sense just to save a few pennies in the short term.


Fisty, Kentucky, is in the 606 Area Code in the US telephone system.

And from looking in the AHD to see if fisty was related to feisty, I found a different kind of fist -- feist:
PRONUNCIATION: f ī s t

VARIANT FORMS: also fice (f ī s)

NOUN: Chiefly Southern U.S. A small mongrel dog.

ETYMOLOGY: Variant of obsolete fist, short for fisting dog, from Middle English fisting, a blowing, breaking wind, from Old English f ī s t i n g. See pezd- in Appendix I.

REGIONAL NOTE: Feist, also fice, is one of several regional terms for a small mixed-breed dog. Used throughout the Midland and Southern states, feist connotes a snappy, nervous, belligerent little dog—hence the derived adjective feisty, meaning “touchy, quarrelsome, or spirited,” applicable to animals and to people. Although feist remains a regional word, feisty has now entered standard usage throughout the United States.
Regards//Larry

"To preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of the people always possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them."
-- Attributed to Richard Henry Lee

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Postby Brazilian dude » Thu Nov 03, 2005 9:49 pm

I can think of artifact.

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