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Snarky

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Snarky

Postby sugarmelter » Mon Nov 28, 2005 1:36 pm

defined as irritable or short-tempered; irascible.

apparently this word is Germanic, as shown below. i'd love to know how this word worked its way into English.

From dialectal snark, to nag, from snark, snork, to snore, snort, from Dutch and Low German snorken, of imitative origin.

- c
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Postby Grogie » Mon Nov 28, 2005 3:18 pm

Thanks Sugarmelter. I was familiar with the word but I didn,t know it,s definition.
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Re: Snarky

Postby M. Henri Day » Sun Dec 04, 2005 3:05 pm

sugarmelter wrote:...

i'd love to know how this word worked its way into English

...


Generally speaking, the best (free) on-line source is Douglas Harper's Online Etymology Dictionary (subscribers can naturally refer to the Oxford English Dictionary), but here he doesn't provide much more than what you have written above :

snarky (adj.)
"irritable, short-tempered," 1906, from snark (v.) "to snort" (1866), from an imitative source akin to Low Ger. snarken, N.Fris. snarke, Swed. snarka.


Henri
曾记否,到中流击水,浪遏飞舟?
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Postby tcward » Mon Dec 05, 2005 12:02 am

Reminds me of this word:

snorkel
1944, "airshaft for submarines," from Ger. Schnorchel, from Ger. navy slang Schnorchel "nose, snout," related to schnarchen "to snore" (see snore). So called from its resemblance to a nose and its noise when in use. The Anglicized spelling first recorded 1949. The meaning "curved tube used by a swimmer to breathe under water" is first recorded in 1953.


-Tim
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Postby M. Henri Day » Wed Dec 07, 2005 1:03 pm

tcward wrote:Reminds me of this word:

... The meaning "curved tube used by a swimmer to breathe under water" is first recorded in 1953.


But not too far under water. Remember, pressure increases very quickly - i e, beyond the capacity of human lungs and diaphragm to compensate for - with increasing depth in water. What the snorkel does is allow a swimmer at the surface to breathe with his or her face continually in the water, which obviously facilitates obervation of what is going on down there. If one wants to go to below the surface, one either has to hold one's breath or use scuba equipment....

Henri, who used to do a fair amount of diving on Bronze Age wrecks and stuff like that...
曾记否,到中流击水,浪遏飞舟?
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