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sanguin/sanguinary

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sanguin/sanguinary

Postby KatyBr » Thu Dec 01, 2005 8:18 pm

san·guine (snggwn)
adj.
1.
a. Of the color of blood; red.
b. Of a healthy reddish color; ruddy: a sanguine complexion.
2. Archaic
a. Having blood as the dominant humor in terms of medieval physiology.
b. Having the temperament and ruddy complexion formerly thought to be characteristic of a person dominated by this humor; passionate.
3. Cheerfully confident; optimistic.



[Middle English, from Old French sanguin, from Latin sanguineus, from sanguis, sanguin-, blood.]


sanguine·ly adv.
sanguine·ness, san·guini·ty n.
Word History: The similarity in form between sanguine, "cheerfully optimistic," and sanguinary, "bloodthirsty," may prompt one to wonder how they have come to have such different meanings. The explanation lies in medieval physiology with its notion of the four humors or bodily fluids (blood, bile, phlegm, and black bile). The relative proportions of these fluids was thought to determine a person's temperament. If blood was the predominant humor, one had a ruddy face and a disposition marked by courage, hope, and a readiness to fall in love. Such a temperament was called sanguine, the Middle English ancestor of our word sanguine. The source of the Middle English word was Old French sanguin, itself from Latin sanguineus. Both the Old French and Latin words meant "bloody," "blood-colored," Old French sanguin having the sense "sanguine in temperament" as well. Latin sanguineus was in turn derived from sanguis, "blood," just as English sanguinary is. The English adjective sanguine, first recorded in Middle English before 1350, continues to refer to the cheerfulness and optimism that accompanied a sanguine temperament but no longer has any direct reference to medieval physiology.

and



san·gui·nar·y (snggw-nr)
adj.
1. Accompanied by bloodshed.
2. Eager for bloodshed; bloodthirsty.
3. Consisting of blood.



[Latin sanguinrius, from sanguis, sanguin-, blood.]

sangui·nari·ly (-nâr-l) adv.

The American Heritage® Dictionary of the English Language, Fourth Edition copyright ©2000 by Houghton Mifflin Company. Updated in 2003. Published by Houghton Mifflin Company. All rights reserved.


ThesaurusLegend: Synonyms Related Words AntonymsAdj. 1. sanguinary - accompanied by bloodshed; "this bitter and sanguinary war"
sanguineous, slaughterous, butcherly, gory
bloody - having or covered with or accompanied by blood; "a bloody nose"; "your scarf is all bloody"; "the effects will be violent and probably bloody"; "a bloody fight"
2. sanguinary - marked by eagerness to resort to violence and bloodshed; "bloody-minded tyrants"; "bloodthirsty yells"; "went after the collaborators with a sanguinary fury that drenched the land with blood"-G.W.Johnson
bloodthirsty, bloody-minded
bloody - having or covered with or accompanied by blood; "a bloody nose"; "your scarf is all bloody"; "the effects will be violent and probably bloody"; "a bloody fight"


I just can't put these logically both in the same sentance.

Kt
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Postby M. Henri Day » Sun Dec 04, 2005 4:34 pm

The explanation, Katy, is to be found in the theory of the Four Humours, ascribed to Hippokrates and popularised by Galenos. The frightening thing is that it served as the basis for internal medicine until about 150 years ago. Talk about «Intelligent Design» !...

Henri
曾记否,到中流击水,浪遏飞舟?
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Postby KatyBr » Sun Dec 04, 2005 5:59 pm

M. Henri Day wrote:The explanation, Katy, is to be found in the theory of the Four Humours, ascribed to Hippokrates and popularised by Galenos. The frightening thing is that it served as the basis for internal medicine until about 150 years ago. Talk about «Intelligent Design» !...

Henri

Just makes one wonder what basic error 'we' are laboring beneath at present? Perhaps in 200 years we will be 'more enlightened'?

Kt
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Postby M. Henri Day » Wed Dec 07, 2005 1:14 pm

KatyBr wrote:...

Just makes one wonder what basic error 'we' are laboring beneath at present? ...


Probably quite a few ! Let us hope that none of them prove so dire that our descendants won't be around in 200 years to have a good - if wry - laugh at our expense !...

Henri
曾记否,到中流击水,浪遏飞舟?
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Postby Stargzer » Thu Dec 08, 2005 1:15 am

M. Henri Day wrote:The explanation, Katy, is to be found in the theory of the Four Humours, . . .

Henri


And here all along I thought the Four Humors were Puns, Spoonerisms, Shaggy-dog stories, and Double-entendres. :(
Regards//Larry

"To preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of the people always possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them."
-- Attributed to Richard Henry Lee
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Postby KatyBr » Thu Dec 08, 2005 2:40 pm

M. Henri Day wrote:
Probably quite a few ! Let us hope that none of them prove so dire that our descendants won't be around in 200 years to have a good - if wry - laugh at our expense !...

Henri

Well until they refer to what they are doing as an expertise rather than practicing I shall not allow them to experiment on me, nor push their drugs, Which to me at least is our modern-day "four Humours".

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Postby M. Henri Day » Thu Dec 08, 2005 4:37 pm

Stargzer wrote:...

And here all along I thought the Four Humors were Puns, Spoonerisms, Shaggy-dog stories, and Double-entendres. :(


I should have opted for puns myself, Larry, before trying to read the Wikipedia article to which you provided a link and there stumbling across the following :

A pun can rely on the assumed equivalency of multiple similar horse words (homonymy) ...


I got so confused trying to decide whether the author was referring to Equus spp or to utterances by people who liked their bourbon and a cig a little too much, that I gave up and went back to reading Galenos. So can it go !...

Henri

PS : Speaking of Wikipedia, have you heard the latest?...
曾记否,到中流击水,浪遏飞舟?
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Postby KatyBr » Thu Dec 08, 2005 5:04 pm

The four humours of the apocalypse!

Kt
or four Houyhnhnms of the apocalypse
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Postby M. Henri Day » Thu Dec 08, 2005 5:16 pm

More likely the Four Yahoos....

Henri
曾记否,到中流击水,浪遏飞舟?
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Postby KatyBr » Thu Dec 08, 2005 5:17 pm

KatyBr wrote:The four humours of the apocalypse!

Kt
or four Houyhnhnms of the apocalypse

the very clear difference between the intelligent mind and the purely silly mind.
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Postby KatyBr » Thu Dec 08, 2005 5:19 pm

M. Henri Day wrote:More likely the Four Yahoos....

Henri

you are mean,Henri,

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Postby M. Henri Day » Thu Dec 08, 2005 6:10 pm

Sorry, Katy ! Can't we blame Swift, who's no longer around to know ?...

Henri
曾记否,到中流击水,浪遏飞舟?
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Postby KatyBr » Fri Dec 09, 2005 1:38 am

M. Henri Day wrote:Sorry, Katy ! Can't we blame Swift, who's no longer around to know ?...

Henri

Doesn't matter Henri, I see the board is taking an ugly turn, I'm taking a powder. y'all have a very lovely season(ing's) Greeting, color me gone.
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Postby Stargzer » Fri Dec 09, 2005 2:28 am

M. Henri Day wrote:More likely the Four Yahoos....

Henri


"Looks like Henri's lining us up for some of Jonathan's Tom Swifties" said Stargzer as he Googled for an answer . . .
Regards//Larry

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Postby M. Henri Day » Fri Dec 09, 2005 5:28 am

The Wikipedia examples are too good to be missed, said Tom longingly, and forwarded them to the Agora :

* "I didn't know I got airsick," said Tom, heaving it aloft.
* "I used to be a pilot," Tom explained.
* "Let's go downstairs," said Tom to the robber condescendingly.
* "I'm afraid I flunked my electrocardiogram," said Tom half-heartedly.
* "It would never do for the credit to go to anyone else," said Tom in Otomí.
* "I can't remember what I was supposed to buy," said Tom listlessly.
* " ," said Tom blankly.
* "Who discovered radium?" asked Marie curiously.
* "I dropped the toothpaste," said Tom, crestfallen.
* "Don't let me drown in Egypt!" pleaded Tom, deep in denial.
* "Elvis is dead," said Tom expressly.
* "I'll never stick my arm in the lion's mouth again," Tom said offhandedly.
* "I'm wearing my wedding ring," Tom said with abandon.
* "Here I come!" he ejaculated.
* "I've changed my name to Patrick," Tom spat.
* "I know you're bluffing, because I have the other three aces," Tom called high-handedly.


Henri
曾记否,到中流击水,浪遏飞舟?
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