Alphadictionary.com

Our Sponsors

Technical Translation
Website Translation Clip Art
 

Dudgeon

A discussion of word histories and origins.

Dudgeon

Postby Slava » Wed Feb 28, 2007 7:50 pm

I recently saw this used to mean hilt, as in the blade had been shoved in up to the dudgeon. My dictionary says it is of unknown origin, and I'd never seen it used this way. What do you all think? Have you come across this usage? Or is your experience only with "in high dudgeon?"

Nice word, though, so if it hasn't been used before, perhaps I should suggest it as a Good Word.

Slava
User avatar
Slava
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 4450
Joined: Thu Sep 28, 2006 9:31 am
Location: Finger Lakes, NY

Postby Perry » Wed Feb 28, 2007 11:20 pm

Two seperate words apparently.

dudgeon
1573, duggin, of unknown origin. One suggestion is It. aduggiare "to overshadow," giving it the same sense development as umbrage. No clear connection to earlier dudgeon (1380), a kind of wood used for knife handles, which is perhaps from a Fr. word.


I hope that you won't take dudgeon (high or low) at this missive.
"Time is nature's way of keeping everything from happening all at once. Lately it hasn't been working."
Anonymous
User avatar
Perry
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 2306
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 9:50 am
Location: Asheville, NC

Postby bnjtokyo » Thu Mar 01, 2007 2:13 am

Slava, I take it you have never seen or read Shakespeare's Macbeth. Please refer to Act II Scene 1, lns 55-57:

"........I see thee still,
And on thy blade and dudgeon gouts of blood,
Which was not so before."

At your kindest leisure,

BNJTOKYO
bnjtokyo
bnjtokyo
Lexiterian
 
Posts: 301
Joined: Tue Mar 01, 2005 4:11 am
Location: Tokyo

Thank You

Postby Slava » Thu Mar 01, 2007 3:09 pm

Thanks for the responses. While I may have read Macbeth, it would have been many years ago, and I didn't memorize it. It seems Shakespeare did pretty much everything first, eh?

I should have used one of my larger dictionaries, too. Then I would have seen that it is actually two words.

Regards,

Slava
User avatar
Slava
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 4450
Joined: Thu Sep 28, 2006 9:31 am
Location: Finger Lakes, NY

Postby Perry » Fri Mar 02, 2007 11:48 am

Or just turn to the Online Etymology Dictionary. It's informative and fun.
"Time is nature's way of keeping everything from happening all at once. Lately it hasn't been working."
Anonymous
User avatar
Perry
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 2306
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 9:50 am
Location: Asheville, NC


Return to Etymology

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests

cron