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Lucifer and Lucid are cognates

A discussion of word histories and origins.

Lucifer and Lucid are cognates

Postby vaibhavd85 » Sat May 19, 2007 2:37 pm

Lucid (adj): 1) easily understood, clear, intelligible.
2) Showing an ability to think clearly.
This word comes from the Latin root “Lucidus” which means “bright”.

Contextual example:
Because of the professors lucid explanation the abstruse theory of quantum physics started to seem a tad more manageable to the students.

Lucent (adj): shining.
The root “lucidus” is derived form Latin root “lucere” which means, “to shine”, which in turn is derived from the root “lux” which means light. So something that gives out light is lucent.

If you might remember the firm by the name “Lucent technologies” create a mnemonic relating this word to the firm.

Contextual example:
Her lucent countenance belied her melancholic disposition.

In simple words her shining face misrepresented her sad mood. J

Another common cognate of this word is translucent.

Translucent (adj): allowing light to pass through partially; semi transparent.
This word can be split as “trans” (as in transparent, transgression) which means “through “+ “lucere”. Thus something that allows light to pass through partially is translucent.

Contextual example:
The presence of dregs made the water translucent.

Lux (N): SI unit of illumination.

As we have seen the Latin root “lux” means “light”, as far as remembering this root goes I would suggest link it up with the soap brand Lux (Lux aur kya J Imagine that by using this soap your countenance will radiate light, and finally we engineers would be able to find a cheap alternative source of energy).

Pellucid (adj): transparent, limpid, easy to understand.

This word can be split up as “per” which means “through” (as in perambulate, perdition)+ lucere. So something through which lux (light) can pass completely is pellucid.

Contextual example:
Just by looking through the pellucid water one was able to plumb the depth of the lake.

Contextual example:
In his third novel the writer veered of from his pellucid style of writing.

Lucifer (N): the devil, the planet Venus when it rises in the morning, (archaic) a match.

This word can be split up as lux (light) + fer (bearing) thus the meaning develops as light bearing, morning star. “Morning star” is a roman astrological term for the planet Venus, which is the brightest object in the sky after sun and moon. It reaches its maximum brightness shortly before sunrise and shortly after sunset hence the name.

Now the meaning “devil” comes from an archangel by the name Lucifer who in heaven motivated by pride led a revolution against god. On failing he was cast out of heaven .He is associated with the Satan (a word related to shaitan) (the devil) because of this revolt.

If there are any “Rasmus” fans over here like me they might know the song “Lucifer’s angel”.

Elucidate (V): explain, enlighten

This word can be split up as “e” which means “out “+ “lucid”, thus to make something lucid, clear the thing out is to elucidate it.

Contextual example:
In his presentation he tried to elucidate his theory, which propounded a linguistical pattern in Tamil and Korean language.


Regards,
V

I want to enter the field of etymology can anybody suggest me some places/courses for the formal study of the same.
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Postby gailr » Mon May 21, 2007 2:36 am

Lucifer (N): the devil, the planet Venus when it rises in the morning, (archaic) a match.

Lucifer is another word for match.
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Postby skinem » Mon May 21, 2007 8:42 am

VH, are you talking about courses at a physical school or something online?

Gailr, I've only heard one person who actually used the word "Lucifer" for a match--an old guy who's been gone for nearly 40 years now. Read it a bunch of times...
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Postby Stargzer » Mon May 21, 2007 11:05 pm

Just for grins I decided to look up match in Wikipedia and found this gem of a definition in the first line of the article:

A match is a consumable tool for producing fire under controlled circumstances on demand.


What a great turn of phrase!

The article seems to be a good history of matches.

Oh, yeah; lucifers are mentioned in the paragraph about friction matches, which is why I looked this up in the first place.
Regards//Larry

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Postby vaibhavd85 » Sun May 27, 2007 3:11 pm

skinem wrote:VH, are you talking about courses at a physical school or something online?

Gailr, I've only heard one person who actually used the word "Lucifer" for a match--an old guy who's been gone for nearly 40 years now. Read it a bunch of times...


Currently I would prefer some online courses, etymology being my hobby I cant enroll into a school (atleast now).As right now I am just wandering in this vast field. I need some guided effort to develop this hobby of mine.Please suggest.

Regards,
V
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Postby sluggo » Mon May 28, 2007 2:55 pm

We Catholics were taught that Lucifer means "bringer of light", as he (it?) was kind of a shining star among his angel peers before it supposedly went to his head.
(no match pun intended there- strike that word if you like)
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Postby gailr » Tue May 29, 2007 1:02 am

sluggo, you can strike quite a conflagration if you reference the NAB or NIV "How you have fallen from heaven, O morning star, son of the dawn!" instead of the KJV "How art thou fallen from heaven, O Lucifer, son of the morning!" in just the right circles.

One man's semantics are another man's heresy.

-gailr digs up old holy cards and giggles behind them...
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Postby anders » Wed Aug 01, 2007 8:40 am

gailr wrote:sluggo, you can strike quite a conflagration if you reference the NAB or NIV "How you have fallen from heaven, O morning star, son of the dawn!" instead of the KJV "How art thou fallen from heaven, O Lucifer, son of the morning!" in just the right circles.

One man's semantics are another man's heresy.

The most recent Swedish interfaith translation has, like,

Bibel 2000 wrote:the bright star, star of dawn

The "star of dawn" [or, astronomically, of "dusk" as well] (Venus) refers to ancient Middle East myths. Should be no problem for contemporary Christians, most of them having no "Lucifer" in their Bibles.
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Postby Stargzer » Wed Aug 01, 2007 9:38 pm

You mean the Unitarians are right, that the Devil didn't make me do it? Shucks. Now I have to find another excuse! :lol:
Regards//Larry

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Postby Perry » Thu Aug 02, 2007 10:18 am

Interesting to note that in the Hebrew original of the Old Testament Satan is basically a prosecuter. This may be one of the earliest forms of lawyer jokes.
Last edited by Perry on Fri Aug 03, 2007 11:27 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Bailey » Thu Aug 02, 2007 10:58 am

Perry wrote:Interesting to note that in the Hebrew original of the Old Testament Satan is basically a prosecuter. This may be one of the earliest forms of lawer jokes.

must be an aversary.

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Postby gailr » Thu Aug 02, 2007 2:32 pm

Perry wrote:Interesting to note that in the Hebrew original of the Old Testament Satan is basically a prosecuter. This may be one of the earliest forms of lawer jokes.

An understanding retained in the now-defunct office of advocatus diaboli, tasked with obstructing the RC canonization process.

"Representing the devil pro bono." ―Christopher Hitchens
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lucy

Postby melissa » Wed Oct 31, 2007 9:55 pm

You mean the Unitarians are right, that the Devil didn't make me do it? Shucks. Now I have to find another excuse! Laughing

replace Unitarians with astrologers
and you are half there!

Lucy, you got a lotta splainin' to do!
aw Ricky!
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