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Germania

A discussion of word histories and origins.

Germania

Postby vaibhavd85 » Fri Dec 07, 2007 7:44 pm

Carousal (N): A bout of carousing, a drunken revel.
This word can be split as "gar" which means "all" + "aus" which has a lots of meanings in German language but in this context it means "out", the word comes from the German term, gar aus trinken, which means to drink heavily. So carousal has to do with heavy drinking.

Contextual example:
Ich leibe das gar nicht, which means I don’t like that at "all".

Waltz (N): a dance in triple time performed by a couple, who turn rhythmically round and round as they progress around the dance floor.

This word comes from the Germanic root "walzen" which means to revolve, roll.

Climate (N):
The word climate comes from the Germanic root "klima", which means the slope of ground, region or zone, well how this is related to the meaning of climate; I think climate can be considered as a measure of certain parameters, "klima" also is a measure. The verb form of this root is "klinein" which means to lean, as in the words recline, incline, declination, acclivity, declivity etc. I will try to consider all these words together in the posts yet to come, but here I would like to introduce you to a word in German language "klimaanlage". "Die Klimaanlage" means an AC, so the Germanic origin of root "klima" is evident here.

Hope this helps!

Regards,
V

My webpage for specific articles related to etymology is,

http://bowlfullofbrokenwords.blogspot.com
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Postby Slava » Mon Nov 15, 2010 9:24 pm

The first word, carousal, is an excellent one for the New Year season, which is coming up in just over a month. Perhaps it can be included in the GWoTD series in late December?
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Postby Audiendus » Fri Dec 03, 2010 9:39 am

The OP's mention of the words "gar" and "klinein" brings to my mind the "garklein" recorder, which is the smallest size of that musical instrument. Garklein means something like "really small" or "absolutely tiny". (I don't know whether klein (small) has anything to do with klinein - the similarity may just be coincidence.)
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Postby Philip Hudson » Thu Mar 01, 2012 8:51 pm

Germania does not mean things German. It is an ancient name for ill defined sections of Eastern Europe in what is now parts of Germany but also included parts of France, Belgium and The Netherlands. Germany is called Germania in some languages. The Germans call themselves Deutsch and their country is Deutschland.

When Virginia's colonial Governor Spotswood, in 1714, settled a group of German immigrants on the edge of civilization, he named the place Germania for reasons that are unclear. Several of my ancestors came in that group. Despite what Wikipedia says, Spotswood, not known for seeing projects to completion, deserted them, leaving them to the Indians. They moved closer to civilization and never got to create the steel knives and weapons for which they were brought to America.

There is also an Insurance Company named Germania. And a College near the site of the German settlement on Virginia is named Germania.

Since the thread is named Germania, there is no sense changing the name. Just remember that this definition has been created recently.
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Postby Perry Lassiter » Sat Mar 03, 2012 8:29 pm

The question is who is to be master, that's all, you or the word. The word means what I choose it to mean. And that's a nice knock-down argument for you! (With apologies to LC)
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Germania

Postby Audiendus » Sat Mar 03, 2012 9:50 pm

Philip Hudson wrote:Germania does not mean things German. It is an ancient name for ill defined sections of Eastern Europe in what is now parts of Germany but also included parts of France, Belgium and The Netherlands. Germany is called Germania in some languages. The Germans call themselves Deutsch and their country is Deutschland.

But Hitler apparently considered renaming Berlin "Germania", to help create a sense of unity among the Germanic peoples of Europe:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Welthauptstadt_Germania
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