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Salad

A discussion of word histories and origins.

Postby saparris » Tue Feb 02, 2010 12:47 pm

Back to salad.....

If salad was originally a form of preserving food, is the term salad pickles redundant?
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Postby LukeJavan8 » Tue Feb 02, 2010 12:57 pm

Probably in caroliner or appelchooey.
Never heard of them myself. Are they green??
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Postby saparris » Tue Feb 02, 2010 1:09 pm

Salad pickles are also called bread and butter pickles, but I've seen them marketed both ways--and not just in the South.

Personally, I'd rather not eat pickles with bread and butter. I prefer honey, jelly, or preserves.
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Postby LukeJavan8 » Tue Feb 02, 2010 1:22 pm

I totally love bread and butter pickles. Forgot about them
since I do little cooking, burn water trying to boil it, as
you know: so I put them on my grocery list.

Don't eat much bread and butter, with or without
pickles: usually PB & J, for the reasons above.

Still never heard of salad pickles, will check out labels
when in the pickle section of the grocery, wherever that
is

and I usually buy my salads pre-made with a little packet
of dressing. Saves on Iceberg (which has no food value)
romaine, etc. Like spinach too!
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Postby saparris » Tue Feb 02, 2010 1:30 pm

Be careful in the salad section. That's where they keep the rape.
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Postby LukeJavan8 » Tue Feb 02, 2010 1:35 pm

Another appelchooey - ism?
You lost me on that one.
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Postby saparris » Tue Feb 02, 2010 1:48 pm

Rape is a leafy green vegetable, much like spinach.
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Postby LukeJavan8 » Tue Feb 02, 2010 2:09 pm

Not sold here, at least not in the produce section of
any store I have ever been in. Maybe some specialty
place I never visit. But I am usually careful in the
produce section: that is where most pick-ups are
supposed to be, according to TV which is all-knowing
in everything.
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Postby saparris » Tue Feb 02, 2010 4:30 pm

If you're picking up anything but groceries (or being picked up) in a supermarket, you're in the wrong supermarket.

However, if it's buy one, get one free........
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Postby Slava » Wed Feb 03, 2010 12:39 am

saparris wrote:Rape is a leafy green vegetable, much like spinach.
It's also the leftovers from squishing grapes to make wine.
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Postby Slava » Wed Feb 03, 2010 12:43 am

Going all the way back to the salt of salad, it appears that souse is also related. One would souse their veggies or whatnot, which meant soaking them in a brine-like liquid.

This is what we do when we pickle things, which is what the Russian "solyonnie" means: pickled.

So, if you're pickled you're soused, and vice-versa.

How booze entered the picture, i do not know. Last I knew, it wasn't particularly salty. Liquid, yes. Salty, no.
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Postby beck123 » Wed Feb 03, 2010 7:37 am

saparris wrote:Rape is a leafy green vegetable, much like spinach.


The brain police have changed the name of "rape" to "canola." In my area, the leaves are generally not marketed, but the oil, pressed from seeds, is quite common everywhere. If I remember, it's a cold-weather plant, and most of ours comes from Canada.
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Postby beck123 » Wed Feb 03, 2010 7:42 am

Slava wrote:
saparris wrote:Rape is a leafy green vegetable, much like spinach.
It's also the leftovers from squishing grapes to make wine.


The more commonly-used word for the grape leftovers is "must," and its presence or absence in the subsequent steps of wine-making are very influential in the outcome of the product. Without must, for example, our red wines would not be red, because the greatest part of the red color is derived from the skins. Even some champagnes are actually made with red grapes, minus the must.
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Postby beck123 » Wed Feb 03, 2010 7:48 am

Slava wrote:How booze entered the picture, i do not know. Last I knew, it wasn't particularly salty. Liquid, yes. Salty, no.


Vinegar was a common alternative to salt for preserving foods, and vinegar was derived exclusively from wine in the old days, so there's the link.

Of course, alcohol itself is a good preservative, too. Charles Darwin later complained that many of the specimens he send to England on home-bound British vessels never made it, because the sailors would open the kegs (in which the specimens were preserved in alcohol) and drink the liquid. To this day, British seamen use the phrase, "having a sip of the admiral" to mean having a drink, because Admiral Nelson's body was sent home from Trafalgar in a keg of rum.
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Postby LukeJavan8 » Wed Feb 03, 2010 11:15 am

Slava wrote:Going all the way back to the salt of salad, it appears that souse is also related. One would souse their veggies or whatnot, which meant soaking them in a brine-like liquid.

This is what we do when we pickle things, which is what the Russian "solyonnie" means: pickled.

So, if you're pickled you're soused, and vice-versa.

How booze entered the picture, i do not know. Last I knew, it wasn't particularly salty. Liquid, yes. Salty, no.



I volunteer at an Alcoholic's rehab: the word "soused"
comes up all the time.
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