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Chemistry - opposite of turbulent

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Chemistry - opposite of turbulent

Postby Ilka » Mon Jun 06, 2005 5:27 pm

Hi,

I am translating a text about a sprayed mixture of water and alcohol that needs to be "still/tranquil/calm" in order to ignite. Does anyone know which word is used in chemistry in English? Whatever it is, it's the opposite of "turbulent".

Thanks.

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Postby bnjtokyo » Tue Jun 07, 2005 6:24 am

"Still" seems to the best choice. However, I find it difficult to imagine a "still" spray. Is it supposed to ignite while it is being sprayed? Or after the spray has accumulated on a surface?
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Postby Apoclima » Tue Jun 07, 2005 7:01 am

I can't think of it! But it must have to do with the fact that alcohol evaporates more quickly, and once the mixture has been spread, the water settles behind and the alcohol begins to evaporate forming a flammable vapor above the surface of the remaining water-alcohol mixture!

Larry?

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Postby Stargzer » Tue Jun 07, 2005 3:03 pm

A couple of links from the AlphaDictionary Chemistry Dictionaries page, although don't know how good they are. If they don't help you now they may be of use in the future.

http://koal2.cop.fi/leonardo/

http://www-woc.sci.kun.nl/translation/


I was thinking of the term quiescent, but I don't know if it's used in chemistry, other than a "quiescently frozen confection," which used to appear on the wrapper of the Good Humor Ice Cream I sold during the summer in college. It's been 32 years since I had to remember any chemistry.

Webster's 1828 seems to have a relevant definition.

How exactly is it used?
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Postby Ilka » Tue Jun 07, 2005 4:52 pm

bnjtokyo wrote:"However, I find it difficult to imagine a "still" spray. Is it supposed to ignite while it is being sprayed?

The spray mist is what ignites -- after it's been sprayed. But like you say, I can't really imagine it ever being still. The document just says that still, dense spray mist with small droplets ignites more readily than turbulent, less dense sprays.

Larry, it looks like you found it for me. "Quiescent gas" gets plenty of hits on Google, and what clinched it for me is that it does well in combination with "turbulent". Thanks very much.

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Postby Stargzer » Tue Jun 07, 2005 10:02 pm

Ilka wrote: . . .The spray mist is what ignites -- after it's been sprayed. But like you say, I can't really imagine it ever being still. The document just says that still, dense spray mist with small droplets ignites more readily than turbulent, less dense sprays.
. . .

Ilka


Let's take another crack at it.

How about the adjective fine or the noun mist as in a fine mist?

See also the AHD entry for mist

A mist is not turbulent, as a spray would be, since the particle size is finer, i. e., smaller.
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Postby tcward » Wed Jun 08, 2005 12:13 am

Fine mist! That's got my vote. But it looks like Ilka's already started running with the other suggestion...

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Postby anders » Wed Jun 08, 2005 6:55 pm

The opposite of "turbulent" would normally be "laminar", referring to the flow characteristics, but that doesn't seem to fit the context. What are the words of the original language?
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Postby bnjtokyo » Thu Jun 09, 2005 5:53 am

The document just says that still, dense spray mist with small droplets ignites more readily than turbulent, less dense sprays.


Maybe a "coherent, dense spray" ignites more readily than a turbulent one.

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