Alphadictionary.com

Our Sponsors

Technical Translation
Website Translation Clip Art
 

Internationalising internet studies

Miscellaneous Other Topics.

Internationalising internet studies

Postby M. Henri Day » Tue Dec 13, 2005 12:12 pm

Even here on this linguistic forum, it is the English language which dominates almost totally (aside from some chicken scratches), but most of us seem to be open to other tongues. Thus I thought that the question of how communication in other languages is beginning to affect the internet would be of great interest to fellow Agorists - who knows, perhaps someone would like to contribute a paper !...

Henri

MCLC LIST
From: xposted from H-ASIA
Subject: internationalizing internet studees--cfp
*************************************************************

Call for papers: Internationalizing Internet Studies

Location: Australia
Call for Papers Date: 2006-01-31
Date Submitted: 2005-12-11
Announcement ID: 148929

'Internationalizing Internet Studies'
Call for papers for a edited collection by
Gerard Goggin (University of Sydney) & Mark McLelland (University of
Wollongong)

From the mid-1990s onwards, the Internet has shifted fundamentally from
its co-ordinates in English-speaking countries, especially North America,
to become an essential medium in a wide range of countries, cultures, and
languages. According to October 2005 statistics, Chinese language now
represents 14% of all Internet communication and media use, Spanish 9% and
Japanese 9%. At 35% and falling, English use is now a minority in terms of
overall online language use. However, communications and media
scholarship, especially in the Anglophone world, has not registered the
deep ramifications of this shift - and the challenges it poses to the
concepts, methods, assumptions, and frameworks used to study the Internet.

The vast body of Anglophone scholarship into 'the Internet' is predicated
on research on and about English-language websites by academics and other
researchers working and publishing in English. Despite the fact that there
is also a large body of work being produced by scholars in
non-English-speaking cultures and locales, hardly any of this work is
being translated and it has had little impact on theorization of the
developing fields of Internet and web studies.

The purpose of this anthology, 'Internationalizing Internet Studies', is
to acknowledge that Internet use and Internet studies take place
'elsewhere' in various national and international contexts. We seek to
uncover how non-Anglophone uses of the Internet might challenge certain
preconceived notions about the technology and its social impacts as well
as the manner in which Internet studies is taken up, valued and taught
outside the circuits of understanding prevalent in Anglophone academia.
Through bringing together researchers whose daily experience of the
Internet is mediated through non-Anglophone languages and cultures as well
as researchers situated within the Anglophone academy whose work focuses
on cultures outside North America and Europe, we hope to promote the
visibility of work already being done outside the Anglophone world. We
also aim to encourage new work that critically engages with Anglophone
Internet scholarship that is based on research into diverse locales and
draws upon a range of intellectual traditions.

Accordingly, we wish to gather together a distinctive collection of
contributors who can illuminate the key features of the Internet's
internationalization, surveying exemplary Internet language groups and
cultures. We hope to encourage explorations of the distinctive features of
the consumption and use of the Internet by various language groups, and
how this expands and questions taken-for-granted notions of Internet
studies.

We are also interested in contributions that reflect upon this
cosmopolitan turn in the Internet, and what it signifies for our methods,
tools, and concepts of Internet studies - and for media, communication,
and cultural theory themselves. Here we are concerned with the debate -
yet to emerge - on the internationalization of 'Internet studies'.

Contributions would be welcomed, but are not restricted to, the following
topics:
* non-anglophone language communities use of the Internet
* Asian countries and communities use of the Internet (especially Chinese,
Japanese, and Korean)
* mobility and the Internet: how the Internet is deployed by people on the
move across borders
* use of the Internet by diasporic communities
* Internet use by minority language speakers in majority Anglophone and
other language contexts
* Indigenous use of the Internet
* how particular Internet technologies (websites, peer-to-peer
technologies, blogs, social software, mobile Internet) have been shaped
and are used by different language and cultural groups
* cell phone, mobile and wireless technologies and the internationalizing
of the Internet
* how does this change our understanding of Internet cultures and cultural
histories?
* what the implications of internationalizing of the Internet for debates
concerning cultural citizenship and media diversity? (not least Internet
governance, open source and commons debates)
* what are the implications of increasing 'global governance' of the
Internet for local and countercultural communities?
* how is Internet studies responding to the internationalizing of the
Internet - what new concepts, methods, locations and relationships does it
need?
Timeframe:

Please send abstracts of no more than 500 words to both editors outlining
your proposed contribution to the edited collection by 31 January 2006. We
will advise acceptance by 1 April 2006.

We will be holding a workshop on 'Internationalizing Internet Studies' in
Brisbane on 27 September 2006 immediately before the Association of
Internet Researchers (AoIR) Annual Conference 7.0, and hope that we will
be able to invite some contributors to attend and present drafts of their
full papers. (We expect limited travel bursaries will be available for
those attending from outside Australia).

About the Editors:

From January 2006, Dr Gerard Goggin (g.goggin@uq.edu.au) will be an ARC
Australian Research Fellow in the Department of Media and Communication,
the University of Sydney. He has published widely on Internet and new
media, including Digital Disability (2003), Virtual Nation: The Internet
in Australia (2004) and Cell Phone Culture (forthcoming 2006).

Dr Mark McLelland (m.mclelland@uq.edu.au) is a Lecturer in the School of
Social Sciences, Media and Communication at the University of Wollongong.
Recent Internet-related publications include Japanese Cybercultures (2003)
and Queer Japan from the Pacific War to the Internet Age (2005).


Dr Gerard Goggin (g.goggin@uq.edu.au) Australian Research Fellow in the
Department of Media and Communication, the University of Sydney, Australia

Dr Mark McLelland (m.mclelland@uq.edu.au) School of Social Sciences, Media
and Communication University of Wollongong Australia.
Email: m.mclelland@uq.edu.au
曾记否,到中流击水,浪遏飞舟?
M. Henri Day
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1142
Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2005 8:24 am
Location: Stockholm, SVERIGE

Postby Slava » Fri Apr 23, 2010 10:38 pm

Does anyone out there know what became of this project?

Does anyone wish to comment? I expect most of you would have way back then, but there is new blood out there, so I thought I'd run it up the flagpole and see if anyone saluted it.

Fire away!
Life is like playing chess with chessmen who each have thoughts and feelings and motives of their own.
User avatar
Slava
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 4559
Joined: Thu Sep 28, 2006 9:31 am
Location: Finger Lakes, NY

Postby Stargzer » Fri Apr 23, 2010 11:08 pm

Tippity-tap-tippity-tap-tippity-tap-tap-tap-bing!

The Call for Papers.

The first Book would have set you back a good chunk of change.

The later edition must be the paperback edition or else overstock headed for the bargin bins.

Make sure you order the correct ISBN number!
Regards//Larry

"To preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of the people always possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them."
-- Attributed to Richard Henry Lee
User avatar
Stargzer
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 2546
Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2005 3:56 pm
Location: Crownsville, MD

Postby Slava » Sat Apr 24, 2010 12:13 am

Stargzer wrote:Tippity-tap-tippity-tap-tippity-tap-tap-tap-bing!

Doth thou not geegle, er, gargle, eh, whatever that site's called?

Stargzer wrote:The first Book would have set you back a good chunk of change.
Ka-ching! A c-note for this? Yabowza!

Good work and fast service, to give obeisance where due.

Now, to add fuel to the fire, what do people think about the numbers of users quoted in the Call for Papers? I don't really question the actual numbers, but something about how they are used disturbs me. Just how are Anglophone countries and sites to include Chinese and Japanese potential readers? Who's going to pay for the translations the original post says are lacking? Etc.
Life is like playing chess with chessmen who each have thoughts and feelings and motives of their own.
User avatar
Slava
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 4559
Joined: Thu Sep 28, 2006 9:31 am
Location: Finger Lakes, NY

Postby Stargzer » Sat Apr 24, 2010 12:23 am

Bing happens to be in the top of the browser. I often use Yahoo!, but sometimes Google. I just got in the habit of using Yahoo! long ago.


You didn't really expect me to READ that call for papers, did you?
Regards//Larry

"To preserve liberty, it is essential that the whole body of the people always possess arms, and be taught alike, especially when young, how to use them."
-- Attributed to Richard Henry Lee
User avatar
Stargzer
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 2546
Joined: Tue Feb 15, 2005 3:56 pm
Location: Crownsville, MD

Postby Slava » Sat Apr 24, 2010 1:01 am

Stargzer wrote:You didn't really expect me to READ that call for papers, did you?
Well, I had vague hopes someone might. Here's the biggest bit I'm niggling at:

the Internet has shifted fundamentally from its co-ordinates in English-speaking countries, especially North America, to become an essential medium in a wide range of countries, cultures, and languages. According to October 2005 statistics, Chinese language now represents 14% of all Internet communication and media use, Spanish 9% and Japanese 9%. At 35% and falling, English use is now a minority in terms of overall online language use. However, communications and media scholarship, especially in the Anglophone world, has not registered the deep ramifications of this shift - and the challenges it poses to the concepts, methods, assumptions, and frameworks used to study the Internet.
Life is like playing chess with chessmen who each have thoughts and feelings and motives of their own.
User avatar
Slava
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 4559
Joined: Thu Sep 28, 2006 9:31 am
Location: Finger Lakes, NY


Return to Res Diversae

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 2 guests