Alphadictionary.com

Our Sponsors

Technical Translation
Website Translation Clip Art
 

Confused Blonde

A forum for discussing US dialects (accents).

Confused Blonde

Postby Jackie » Mon May 22, 2006 6:40 pm

Think this test was great fun. Was sent it by a friend. And did it. According to it I am 83% Dixie. :o

Not bad for someone from Scotland :D :D Ok my maiden name is Sutherland, which means Southlander. And we do hope to retire to South Mis. Next year. And the best roast beef po-boys can be found in Picayune.

Jackie
Beannachd Dae Leat
(Scottish Gaelic for "Gods' blessings attend thee")
Jackie
Junior Lexiterian
 
Posts: 7
Joined: Mon May 22, 2006 6:16 pm
Location: Scotland (for now)

Postby Slow Moving Vehicle » Mon May 22, 2006 10:45 pm

I'm not entirely surprised that a Scot registers towards the "Southern" end of the scale - Southern dialect owes an awful lot to the Scotch-Irish (that is, Scots who were transplanted to Ulster in the 17th century). The Scotch-Irish settled much of the Carolina - Virginia - Georgia backcountry, and there were sizable communities of Highlanders in North Carolina and in Georgia. And let's face it; the words clannish, stubborn, and overly fond of liquor apply to Rebs and Jocks, yes?
I am not so lost in lexicography as to forget that words are the daughters of earth, and that things are the sons of heaven - Samuel Johnson
Slow Moving Vehicle
Junior Lexiterian
 
Posts: 1
Joined: Mon May 22, 2006 10:29 pm
Location: Atlanta

Re: Confused Blonde

Postby sluggo » Thu Jun 22, 2006 2:11 am

Jackie wrote:Think this test was great fun. Was sent it by a friend. And did it. According to it I am 83% Dixie. :o

Not bad for someone from Scotland :D :D Ok my maiden name is Sutherland, which means Southlander. And we do hope to retire to South Mis. Next year. And the best roast beef po-boys can be found in Picayune.

Jackie


Jackie, welcome, Cead Mile Failte and I hope you'll come out to the Jackson Celtic Fest in September for some Scottish tunes from our New Orleans Strathspey and Reel Society!

Since the "Scots-Irish" immigrant influence has been brought up: while studying Scottish Gaelic years ago I noticed that (forgive the memory, this is a little sketchy) verbs denoting present action (walking, working, thinking) have a short preposition attached in the Gallaig- was it AN maybe?- meaning "at", as in "at-working" or "in the act of" to denote that it's going on right now. I figured this must be the derivation of the Appalachian prefix "a-" as in "a-walkin'", "a-thinkin'" etc but wonder if someone might verify....?

SloMo, welcome too!
Stop! Murder us not, tonsured rumpots! Knife no one, fink!
sluggo
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1476
Joined: Wed Apr 12, 2006 1:58 pm
Location: Carolinia Agrestícia: The Forest Primeval

Postby Perry » Thu Jun 22, 2006 9:24 am

Since you dassn't trust to your memory, I am sure that someone is a-fixin' to verify this for you.
"Time is nature's way of keeping everything from happening all at once. Lately it hasn't been working."
Anonymous
User avatar
Perry
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 2306
Joined: Wed Mar 29, 2006 9:50 am
Location: Asheville, NC


Return to The Rebel-Yankee Test

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 4 guests