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Νίκη

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Νίκη

Postby portokalos » Tue Jul 11, 2006 5:46 am

Νίκη.

Can someone confirm that the famous trade mark has origin of this word?
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Re: Νίκη

Postby frank » Tue Jul 11, 2006 6:35 am

portokalos wrote:Νίκη.
Can someone confirm that the famous trade mark has origin of this word?


Yes :-)

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Postby portokalos » Tue Jul 11, 2006 6:55 am

Thank you frank
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Postby Stargzer » Tue Jul 11, 2006 12:56 pm

For those who haven't figured out what the Thread Title is:

Νίκη
Regards//Larry

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Postby anders » Wed Jul 12, 2006 8:36 am

Lots of young Swedes pronounce the shoe label [naik]. :evil:

If needed, I use the same pronunciation as for the Goddess: [ni:ke]
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Postby sluggo » Wed Jul 12, 2006 12:10 pm

Stargzer wrote:For those who haven't figured out what the Thread Title is:

Νίκη


ah, OK. What about those of us who still haven't figured it out?

I infer from Anders' last that this has to do with Nike(?) My first encounter with this word was the US missle defence system of the 1950s, though it too was named for the Goddess.
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Postby sluggo » Wed Jul 12, 2006 12:13 pm

anders wrote:Lots of young Swedes pronounce the shoe label [naik]. :evil:


on a related note, I hear Brits pronounce Nestlé's the same as "nestles" (where USians say "NESS-lees".
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Postby Brazilian dude » Wed Jul 12, 2006 12:28 pm

Lots of young Swedes pronounce the shoe label [naik].

In Brazil too. Even [náiki], since it's not very easy for us to finish a word in a consonant (except m/n, s/z/x, r and l [pronounced as a w, as a matter of fact]). We're like the Italians (and the Japanese), we tend to add a vowel where none exists. :)

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Postby sluggo » Wed Jul 12, 2006 12:39 pm

Brazilian dude wrote:
Lots of young Swedes pronounce the shoe label [naik].

In Brazil too. Even [náiki], since it's not very easy for us to finish a word in a consonant (except m/n, s/z/x, r and l [pronounced as a w, as a matter of fact]). We're like the Italians (and the Japanese), we tend to add a vowel where none exists. :)

Brazilian dude


-which combined with the aspirated/uvular R has led to amusing imports in the music world such as rock ("hockey") and rap ("happy") :wink:
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Postby Brazilian dude » Wed Jul 12, 2006 12:44 pm

Exactly! How did you know that? Você fala português?

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Postby sluggo » Wed Jul 12, 2006 12:45 pm

Brazilian dude wrote:Exactly! How did you know that? Você fala português?

Brazilian dude


Falo muito pouco, mais a música brasileira e minha paixão!
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Postby Brazilian dude » Wed Jul 12, 2006 12:47 pm

Por que não me disse antes? É bom saber que há alguém interessado pela minha língua.

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Postby sluggo » Wed Jul 12, 2006 1:24 pm

Brazilian dude wrote:Por que não me disse antes? É bom saber que há alguém interessado pela minha língua.

Brazilian dude


[il me faut continuez en anglais] The question of what's the most mellifluous language is always subjective but for me it would have to be Portuguese. Sadly I never got far into formally learning the language but have collected Brazilian music for many years. One of the greatest compliments I ever got was while hosting a radio show of Brazilian music a (Bahiana) listener called and told me I have "no accent". So I don't have much in vocabulary or grammar, but from following lyrics I think I may have nailed pronunciation :wink:

Quem não gosta de samba
Bon sujeito não é...
É ruim da cabeça
Ou doente do pé!
-Dorival Caymmi
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Postby Brazilian dude » Wed Jul 12, 2006 1:38 pm

Fico feliz por você e agrada-me muito saber que estima tanto a minha língua.

Agora tente dizer O rato roeu a roupa do rei de Roma. :lol:

Quem não gosta de samba
Bom sujeito não é...
É ruim da cabeça
Ou doente do pé!
-Dorival Caymmi

Sou ruim da cabeça ou doente do pé então. :oops:

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Postby anders » Wed Jul 12, 2006 3:06 pm

OK, my vote is that Portuguese is one of the most beautiful languages for singing, but years ago, the way the guy sounded who presented the news in Portuguese on the long wave Radio Suecia Internacional (or whatever), you wished that you would never encounter that language or have to look at a person twisting his face that way.
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