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Νίκη

A discussion of the peculiarities of languages and the differences between them.

Postby frank » Wed Jul 12, 2006 5:19 pm

anders wrote:Lots of young Swedes pronounce the shoe label [naik]. :evil:
If needed, I use the same pronunciation as for the Goddess: [ni:ke]


Over here we say [naik] and [naiki:]. Never heard [nikè] in connection with the sportswear.

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Postby Stargzer » Wed Jul 12, 2006 5:49 pm

sluggo wrote:
Stargzer wrote:For those who haven't figured out what the Thread Title is:

Νίκη


ah, OK. What about those of us who still haven't figured it out?

I infer from Anders' last that this has to do with Nike(?) My first encounter with this word was the US missle defence system of the 1950s, though it too was named for the Goddess.


Yes, Nike. It's just that the subject is really IS Greek, but the way it prints out on in the subject line it looks more like cartoon cusswords. :)

We used to pass an abandoned Nike base in Southern Maryland on our way to camping with the Boy Scouts.
Regards//Larry

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Idiomatic Transmission?

Postby sluggo » Wed Jul 12, 2006 8:08 pm

Brazilian dude wrote:Fico feliz por você e agrada-me muito saber que estima tanto a minha língua.

Agora tente dizer O rato roeu a roupa do rei de Roma. :lol:

Brazilian dude


Well as I said I never got schooled in Portuguese so I pasted your 2nd sentence into BabelFish for translation -this is always a thrilling verbal adventure, and the Fish came through in typical style:
"Now it tries to say the rat gnawed the clothes of the king of Rome" :lol:

I'm sure there's a story here. Elucidation invited... 'brigado
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Postby Stargzer » Wed Jul 12, 2006 9:30 pm

From Systranet:

I am happy for you and very pleases to know me that they esteem my language in such a way.

Now it tries to say the rat gnawed the clothes of the king of Rome.


It must be an idom. :?
Regards//Larry

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Postby Brazilian dude » Wed Jul 12, 2006 9:39 pm

It's just a tongue-twister built upon the r sound.

Brazilian dude
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Postby sluggo » Wed Jul 12, 2006 10:32 pm

Brazilian dude wrote:It's just a tongue-twister built upon the r sound.

Brazilian dude


Ah, an excercise! Like "The sick Sheik's sixth sheep's sick". I'm all over it. Muito obrigado, BD.
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Postby portokalos » Thu Jul 13, 2006 2:31 am

The most of the Greeks don't know that the word is greek and pronounce the product as naik.
Νίκη means victory in greek and also is a common women name.There is Νίκος for men but is a shortcut of the name Nikolaos.
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