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Advanced Rebel-Yankee Test

A forum for discussing US dialects (accents).

Postby Stargzer » Wed Jul 19, 2006 2:20 pm

sluggo wrote: . . . Meanwhile...
Stargzer wrote:... native Baltimorons go "Downy Oshun." {snippity}.


Would it be too obscure to suggest this sounds like a warm and fuzzy Yoruban spirit?


Uh, yes. :?

Yo, Ruban! Fetch me up a fresh pot of Yuban, Man!
Regards//Larry

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Postby sluggo » Wed Jul 19, 2006 2:53 pm

Stargzer wrote:
sluggo wrote: . . . Meanwhile...
Stargzer wrote:... native Baltimorons go "Downy Oshun." {snippity}.


Would it be too obscure to suggest this sounds like a warm and fuzzy Yoruban spirit?


Uh, yes. :?

Yo, Ruban! Fetch me up a fresh pot of Yuban, Man!


Sacrilege! But funny. (sidenote: why is it sacrilegious but religious?

I bet BD gets it (maybe spelt Oxún in Brasil)
Or I could have tossed in a link. Check out the holy-day.
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Postby Huny » Wed Jul 19, 2006 5:21 pm

sluggo wrote:I bet BD gets it (maybe spelt Oxún in Brasil)
Or I could have tossed in a link. Check out the holy-day.


Oshun-

SYMBOLS: Metal fan, brass bracelets worn by priestesses, pot of honey, rainbow, golden chain which ties all her people together, shells, yellow scarves, mirrors, the river Oshun. all flowing water, the number 5 and multiples of 5.

Need I say more? 8)
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Postby sluggo » Wed Jul 19, 2006 7:50 pm

Huny wrote:
sluggo wrote:I bet BD gets it (maybe spelt Oxún in Brasil)
Or I could have tossed in a link. Check out the holy-day.


Oshun-

SYMBOLS: Metal fan, brass bracelets worn by priestesses, pot of honey, rainbow, golden chain which ties all her people together, shells, yellow scarves, mirrors, the river Oshun. all flowing water, the number 5 and multiples of 5.

Need I say more? 8)


Ah, we are in the presents of royalty. Can I open mine? Huh?
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Postby moumantai » Tue Jul 25, 2006 10:26 am

i got 87 percent dixie do i still use confeterite money

i had a bit of trouble with the oil question i say oy-yill but that wasnt on your test

6 how do people in my area greet others

its either howdy or hi like rouge from x-men thats how i say hi

i seem to say i the same way but i didnt know til a friend told me how i sounded lol
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Postby GoCat » Thu Aug 03, 2006 10:39 am

skinem wrote:Ahhh...southern tea--nectar of the gods and not for those with weak constitutions nor with a history of diabetes in the family. You can tell a Yankee (anyone not from the South) visiting the south when they ask for tea specifying that it be iced. Everyone down here KNOWS that iced is the way it was meant to be served! And to specify "non-sweet" tea is to admit to a weakness in constitution if not character.


I was in California 5 years ago and asked for tea. The waitress asked, "hot or cold?"

Toto, I've a feeling we're not in the South anymore!

I DID know better than to specify "sweet tea", knowing they weren't going to have it.

:roll:
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Postby sharonha » Thu Aug 10, 2006 4:18 pm

#11 A lot of people in MN say "rubber binder" which always has me looking for a 3-ring binder with a rubberized cover.

#12 Agree that DE, SE PA, and NJ say "wood-er" (like the word "wood" with "er" on the end.)

#13. Most people I know say "oy-yill" or "oy-yul" which is not an option. Perhaps this would be easier if we could all write in IPA!

- born and raised in Delaware, adult life in Minnesota.
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Postby moumantai » Thu Aug 10, 2006 6:58 pm

ill retake the test again next time he changes it

ya know since you posted sharonha i relized i say oil like oy-yul lol

i know pointless repley but i just wanted to mention that lol
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I am improving

Postby Jackie » Mon Oct 30, 2006 6:56 pm

Took the first test and scored 83%. This time I got 100% :D :D .

As we are moving to South Mis this coming Spring I am serving my redneck apprenticeship so the score is important. I do have to thank Dr Goodword for his Southern dictionary, it has been a great help. As have the regular supplies of grits(Cannot get them in Scotland) and Folger's coffee that friends send us.
Beannachd Dae Leat
(Scottish Gaelic for "Gods' blessings attend thee")
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Postby skinem » Mon Oct 30, 2006 7:59 pm

Jackie, welcome soon to what some refer to as the "promised land." (Notice they never tell you who promised it to whom nor what for.)
Welcome to the alpha. If you need any help with translating any "Southernism", you'll find plenty of help here.
I hope your move goes well and that you like it once you arrive.
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Postby scw1217 » Sat Jan 13, 2007 10:02 am

My score was 66% Southern. I think my score would differ though following an afternoon in the presence of my relatives. :lol:

My biggest southernism, which was not on the list, is "pilla" instead of pillow, or "winda" instead of "window". My husband would attest to my inability to say those 2 words right.

As to the content of the test, about 3 of them did not have an answer that really applied to me.

#3, I had a hard time choosing. #4, I say "over there" and not "way over there". #6, I say none of those. (I prefer to just smirk and keep walking. lol) #9, I neither rummage or plunder, so perhaps I should have said option 3. I tend to "look" for things. #14, again I say none of those.
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Postby txmusicgirl » Wed Jun 13, 2007 5:54 pm

GoCat wrote:
skinem wrote:Ahhh...southern tea--nectar of the gods and not for those with weak constitutions nor with a history of diabetes in the family. You can tell a Yankee (anyone not from the South) visiting the south when they ask for tea specifying that it be iced. Everyone down here KNOWS that iced is the way it was meant to be served! And to specify "non-sweet" tea is to admit to a weakness in constitution if not character.


I was in California 5 years ago and asked for tea. The waitress asked, "hot or cold?"

Toto, I've a feeling we're not in the South anymore!

I DID know better than to specify "sweet tea", knowing they weren't going to have it.

:roll:


In N.Texas we only drink sweet tea and if you ask for a glass of tea you get iced sweet tea. You have to specify unsweet or hot.
and yeah it true its not for those weak at heart, cuz when you say sweet thats what you get. lol
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Postby txmusicgirl » Wed Jun 13, 2007 5:56 pm

When I took it i was 100% Is General Lee your Grandfather.

I'm so Southern sometimes even people here make fun of my accent :lol:
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Postby kadoodle76 » Mon Oct 22, 2007 12:22 am

I did'nt read through all of these posts but does anyone else here ever say "yontu?" as in "do you want to?" and for the monday question on the test...my mom always says mondee or tuesdee. She also says peanit instead of peanut. She grew up in a rural part of pennsylvania. Also, gums(like in your mouth)...I get so annoyed when people say Gooms...do you know anyone else who does that?bye y'all (she says as a former floridean who drinks soda not pop


p.s. is it diabeetees or diabeetis
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Postby gailr » Mon Oct 22, 2007 12:57 am

Welcome, kadoodle. One midwestern friend rhymed gums with brooms; not sure where she got that.

And what's wrong with peanit? :wink:

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