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British slang

A discussion of slang and the changes it undergoes.

Slang

Postby Jackie » Sat Dec 02, 2006 5:20 pm

OH Shhhugar!!!!! just cannot think of any dadblasted words like that, dangnabit!!!

Although in Scotland "OH ya Bonnie Laddie!!!!!!" can mean a variety of things good and bad, one must gauge the tone to judge the meaning.
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(Scottish Gaelic for "Gods' blessings attend thee")
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Postby sluggo » Sat Dec 02, 2006 9:37 pm

Jackie, I for one hope you will grace us with posties more often. It's such a rich land ye have there. And you've reminded me to pass on a couple of interesting sites:

One I found useful while sussing out the phrases "Scotch the rumour" and "to get off Scot free"--but it is no longer available.

and this one, which only a minute ago finally made sense out of the phrase "so any road" (uttered by John Lennon in "Revolution 9")

Cheers
Stop! Murder us not, tonsured rumpots! Knife no one, fink!
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Postby Bailey » Sat Dec 02, 2006 10:39 pm

I watch British movies and read books by Brits so the slang is not so new to me, but I'm always amazed at the differences as well as the similarities in our speech. I'm reading a murder mystery set in the 'estates' of London, every single simple sentance must end in innit [which I took to be isn't it, but it doesn't fit ever]. I'm trying to read it without the the slang but I'm flommoxed as to sose, as in "Journey to sose". Mostly I can understand what's going on in context.

mark doing-my-part Bailey

Today is the first day of the rest of your life, Make the most of it...
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Postby Ferrus » Sat Dec 02, 2006 10:52 pm

Bailey wrote:I watch British movies and read books by Brits so the slang is not so new to me, but I'm always amazed at the differences as well as the similarities in our speech. I'm reading a murder mystery set in the 'estates' of London, every single simple sentance must end in innit [which I took to be isn't it, but it doesn't fit ever]. I'm trying to read it without the the slang but I'm flommoxed as to sose, as in "Journey to sose". Mostly I can understand what's going on in context.

mark doing-my-part Bailey
'Innit' is indeed 'isnt it' - though it is rather a shibboleth of the 'chav' (equvalent of Wite Trash in America - think Ali G). As are 'cuz' and 'wiv'. Also the replacing of 't's with glottal stops. As for 'sose' I have no idea, I'd need to see it in more context or hear it spoken.
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Postby sluggo » Sat Dec 02, 2006 11:07 pm

Ferrus wrote:'Innit' is indeed 'isnt it' - though it is rather a shibboleth of the 'chav' (equvalent of Wite Trash in America - think Ali G). As are 'cuz' and 'wiv'. Also the replacing of 't's with glottal stops.


The faux-Britspeak of our jugband I referenced elsewhere is rife to absurdity with innits wiv a few glo'-al stops thrown in. When the phone rang at WWOZ (where we formed), the answer went: "OZ, innit?"
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Postby Palewriter » Sun Dec 03, 2006 3:50 pm

Ferrus wrote:
Bailey wrote:I watch British movies and read books by Brits so the slang is not so new to me, but I'm always amazed at the differences as well as the similarities in our speech. I'm reading a murder mystery set in the 'estates' of London, every single simple sentance must end in innit [which I took to be isn't it, but it doesn't fit ever]. I'm trying to read it without the the slang but I'm flommoxed as to sose, as in "Journey to sose". Mostly I can understand what's going on in context.

mark doing-my-part Bailey
'Innit' is indeed 'isnt it' - though it is rather a shibboleth of the 'chav' (equvalent of Wite Trash in America - think Ali G). As are 'cuz' and 'wiv'. Also the replacing of 't's with glottal stops. As for 'sose' I have no idea, I'd need to see it in more context or hear it spoken.


Let's not forget innit's siblings:

are-nigh (aren't I)
in-ee (isn't he)
in-she (isn't she)

Strangely, you don't often hear much of "aren't we" or "aren't they". It's a bit of an enigma, innit.

I'm guessing that "soze" is as used in: 'er Dad's off his rocker; soze 'er Muvva.

-- PW
"Life is not a journey to the grave with the intention to arrive safely in a pretty and well-preserved body, but rather to skid in broadside, thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and loudly proclaiming: Wow!!! What a ride!"
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Slang

Postby Jackie » Sun Dec 03, 2006 7:59 pm

Ta muckle fir thae sites Sluggo they wir smashin'. An' ah hae tae say that o' aw the dialects in the uk, whit passes fir present day cockney is mair like pidgen english. Ah jis' cannae mak' heid nor tail oh it iva.

A'll also say that this is a braw site ina. Ah div like tae tak a keek at whit is bein' said when ah gits a chance. Efter a' Scots hiv went oot o' thir wey fir hunners o' years tae dae thir best tae educate colonials an' the likes. So ah feel it's only richt that ah dae mah bit ina. The reason we are sae guid at educatin' fowk is we aye speak we sik clear diction.
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Re: Slang

Postby Bailey » Sun Dec 03, 2006 8:19 pm

Jackie wrote:. Ah jis' cannae mak' heid nor tail oh it iva.
I can't make sense of a lot of it either

A'll also say that this is a braw site ina. Ah div like tae tak a keek at whit is bein' said when ah gits a chance. Efter a' Scots hiv went oot o' thir wey fir hunners o' years tae dae thir best tae educate colonials an' the likes. So ah feel it's only richt that ah dae mah bit ina. The reason we are sae guid at educatin' fowk is we aye speak we sik clear diction.

thanks and we hope you will be educating us.

mark it's-only-right-for-us-colonials-to get-back-to-our-roots Bailey

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Postby sluggo » Sun Dec 03, 2006 9:32 pm

Noo there's a reit treat! I fur a body move 'at henceforth Jackie main render aw 'er posts haur in Scots. Guid excercise fur th' een.

Okay, I did hae a wee help wi' 'at
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Postby Bailey » Mon Dec 04, 2006 10:20 am

Palewriter wrote:
I'm guessing that "soze" is as used in: 'er Dad's off his rocker; soze 'er Muvva.

-- PW

In this book there is an Autistic child who drifts off into his own world referred to as sose, I know basically it means la-la land but was wondering about it's origins. Translating has it's perils and pitfalls, and I could be wrong.

mark has-been-to-sose-a-lot Bailey

This book has people sorting a lot too, as in "I'll sort this one."
I'm sure the original phrase was 'sort them out' a pretty clever idiom meaning to "teach them a lesson" but has devolved into a meaningless 'sort'. I'm sure lots of our slang has done this also, but it's slang I don't usually use.

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Postby Sunny » Fri Dec 08, 2006 10:23 pm

We don't often use the word "bugger" in Canada. As a child, I was taught that it was one of those "gray" words, or words that are just not used because they are unbecoming or impolite. (Crap, crud and a few others that escape my memory also fall into that category).

Today, with swearing being the "norm", and ever second word is the "F" word, I challenge my children to find other words to use to express themselves. It is a person with a small mind and small vocabulary that relies heavily on the common swear words of this generation.
One word frees us of all the weight and pain of life: That word is love. Sophocles (496 BC - 406 BC)
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Postby skinem » Fri Dec 08, 2006 11:02 pm

Sunny wrote:We don't often use the word "bugger" in Canada. As a child, I was taught that it was one of those "gray" words, or words that are just not used because they are unbecoming or impolite. (Crap, crud and a few others that escape my memory also fall into that catagory).

Today, with swearing being the "norm", and ever second word is the "F" word, I challenge my children to find other words to use to express themselves. It is a person with a small mind and small vocabulary that relies heavily on the common swear words of this generation.


Glad to know I wasn't the alone with the Skinettes...taught 'em the same thing.
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Postby Ferrus » Fri Jan 26, 2007 7:29 am

'Soze' as a shortening of 'sorry' I do know, but it is usually rendered 'soz'.

Ah jis' cannae mak' heid nor tail oh it iva.


'I can't make head nor tail of it' is a common expression in England too, is it used in America?
skinem wrote:Today, with swearing being the "norm"

Norm is actually a perfectly well respected word, forming the basis of 'normative' - a word every philosophy student will have encountered.
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Postby Perry » Fri Jan 26, 2007 11:55 am

We use the "head or tail of it" on this side of the pond as well.
"Time is nature's way of keeping everything from happening all at once. Lately it hasn't been working."
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Postby Ferrus » Thu Feb 01, 2007 11:05 am

The latest slang word that has been gaining currency among secondary schoolers in the last year of or so is 'safe', as in 'that's safe', or great. Is that an American invention?
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