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Am I correct ? :)

A discussion of word histories and origins.

Am I correct ? :)

Postby vaibhavd85 » Sun Jun 24, 2007 10:57 am

Rectify (V): set right; correct
This word comes from the Latin root “rectus”, which means “right”, so to rectify something is to set it right. On further analysis of this root I came to know that this root actually comes from the verb root “regere”, which means “to lead straight”, “to direct”.

Contextual example:
I will accept your thesis only after you rectify those minor mistakes that I have pointed out. (Profs are always finicky)

Rectitude (N): uprightness; moral virtue; goodness; deceny; morality; probity; righteousness.

This word can be broken down as “rectus” + “tudin”, which means “condition, state or quality”, so something that has the quality of being right, correct can be said to have rectitude.

Contextual example:
One of the most cardinal qualities that politicians of today lack is rectitude.

Some anchor words for this root:
Correct
Erect
Direct
Rectilinear
Rectangle

Now let us analyze the words coming from the root “regere” in its original form.

Regal (Adj): majestic

From the root “regere” which means to “to lead straight”, “to direct “ comes the Latin root “reg” which means “king”, a person who is able to lead people straight is a “reg” i.e. a king, and king like behavior is regal behavior.

Contextual example:
Even though he was one of the king’s descendants his behavior was not regal.

Regale (V): entertain, amuse.

Now as we all know having the ability to direct people, it is but obvious that the person having the same would be having lot of fun with this power, wealth so the verb regale can be explained in such a way (although it seems a bit vague).

Contextual example:
In order to regale his friends the king organized fight competitions in which gladiators fought with other gladiators or wild animals generally to death.

Regicide (N): murder of a king or a queen.

We have seen that the Latin root “reg” means “king”, also you may be familiar to the root “cidere” which means “to cut or kill” (as in suicide, germicide, pesticide, genocide etc)

Contextual example:
After the treason the loyal minister was charged falsely for regicide and beheaded.

Regime (N): method or system of government.

Contextual example:
Under this dictator’s strict regime this country will never progress, said an annoyed democrat.

Regimen (N): prescribed diet and habits.

Contextual example:
Only under the strict regimen prescribed by doctor you have a chance to live till old age.

Some anchor words for this root:
Regiment
Region

Was that helpful? Let me know. As always discussion, cognates, feedback is welcome.

Regards,
V
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Postby Perry » Sun Jun 24, 2007 7:53 pm

Well I certainly would not have known that rectify and regale have so much in common, had you not rectified my understanding.
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Postby gailr » Sun Jun 24, 2007 9:41 pm

rector
NOUN: abbr. R. 1. A cleric in charge of a parish in the Protestant Episcopal Church. 2. An Anglican cleric who has charge of a parish and owns the tithes from it. 3. A Roman Catholic priest appointed to be managerial as well as spiritual head of a church or other institution, such as a seminary or university. 4. The principal of certain schools, colleges, and universities.


Also, rector or rectora is the title of the director at certain religious retreats.
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Re: Am I correct ? :)

Postby Stargzer » Tue Jun 26, 2007 11:41 pm

vaibhavd85 wrote: ... Regale (V): entertain, amuse.

Now as we all know having the ability to direct people, it is but obvious that the person having the same would be having lot of fun with this power, wealth so the verb regale can be explained in such a way (although it seems a bit vague).

Contextual example:
In order to regale his friends the king organized fight competitions in which gladiators fought with other gladiators or wild animals generally to death.

...

Regards,
V


The Agora is regaled whenever we are re-Gailed.

Although she will probably not be amused ...


Thanks, V!
Regards//Larry

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Re: Am I correct ? :)

Postby gailr » Wed Jun 27, 2007 8:52 pm

Stargzer wrote:The Agora is regaled whenever we are re-Gailed.

Although she will probably not be amused ...


Thanks, V!


We are, indeed, amused, for although we direct neither people nor wealth in the agora, we are having fun.



We are also a "V" fan, as evidenced by our political taglines...
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