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To Insure Prompt Service = TIPS

A discussion of word histories and origins.

To Insure Prompt Service = TIPS

Postby eberntson » Thu Apr 21, 2005 9:26 am

I was waiting in a BBQ line and the word "tip" came up, because the line was so slow we were not going to tip the cooks. Anyway, my friend said the origins of "TIPS" came from a restaurant here in the USA where you paid TIPS ahead of time, the reason "to insure prompt service".

Can anyone confirm this?
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Postby tcward » Thu Apr 21, 2005 9:38 am

This sounds dubious to me.

We're all familiar with the "tip" of the hat, for courtesy. I think the expression came out of an act of gratitude for good service, plain and simple.

But what do I know--my thoughts have been called baloney before.

-Tim ;)
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Postby tcward » Thu Apr 21, 2005 9:40 am

From etymonline.com:

tip (v.2)
"give a small present of money to," 1610, "to give, hand, pass," originally thieves' cant, perhaps from tip (v.3) "to tap." The meaning "give a gratuity to" is first attested 1706. The noun in this sense is from 1755; the meaning "piece of confidential information" is from 1845; the verb in this sense is from 1883; tipster first recorded 1862.


The fact that the use of this word in this capacity is attested to the 17th century pretty much squashes the "TIPS" theory.

-Tim
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Postby KatyBr » Thu Apr 21, 2005 10:56 am

Ah, but Tim, we've all heard that tacked to our writings.
a tip is always a good thing,
tip
Dictionarytip1 (tĭp)
n.
1]The end of a pointed or projecting object.
2]A piece or an attachment, such as a cap or ferrule, meant to be fitted to the end of something else: the 3]barbed tip of a harpoon.
tr.v., tipped, tip·ping, tips.
To furnish with a tip.
1]To cover or decorate the tip of: tip strawberries with chocolate.
2]To remove the tip of: tip artichokes.
3]To dye the ends of (hair or fur) in order to blend or improve appearance.
phrasal verb:http://www.answers.com/topic/tip


my favorite is the information tip. What special stock to buy, what horse to bet on, or best... when to plant my tomatoes.

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Postby Iterman » Thu Apr 21, 2005 2:33 pm

My theory (for what it's worth) is a little different. Compare with other languages as French pour boire (for drink), German Trinkgeld (drink money) and Swedish dricks (dricka -> drink) and you will get tip as the top of the sum or the tip of it so the servant can get tipsy (or maybe it's the the other way around). :) :) :) :)
Beg your pardon for my poor spelling and grammer.
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Postby gailr » Thu Apr 21, 2005 11:55 pm

Not etymology, but back in my college waitress-job days (as God is my witness, I will never wait tables again!) there were a couple of demanding customers who used to leave what looked like a folded dollar by the plate. When picked up it was revealed to be a card with the phrase "A tip for you..." and bible verse printed on the back. :( We always wished we could just serve them the menu picture of their food with an inspirational message on the back...

I distinguish between slow service because the server/cook/barber/bellhop/whatever is swamped but really making an effort (good tip) and slow service because s/he is just loafing about (tiny or no tip). Hmmm, perhaps I could get some cards that look like a folded dollar with: "A tip for you: at least pretend that you are working next time and you will get a real tip." on the back. Image

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Postby Apoclima » Fri Apr 22, 2005 12:26 am

I sympathize with waiters and waitresses, although I have never been one. I don't care how bad the service is, I always leave a tip of 20%. I hope that somehow makes up for all the impatient, pompous idiots who think that waiters and waitresses should somehow move quicker and be more obsequious than they can!

I have found that patience and a smile gets me better service than the empty threat of not leaving a tip. Like those people would have left a good one anyway!

Speaking of tips, my friend who runs a restaurant with her husband in the Bay Islands, Honduras says that when Europeans come in, esp. (in this order of rank) Germans, Swedes, and, of course, the French, the restaurant always adds in the tip as a service fee on the bill, because otherwise they really won't tip, and obviously don't understand the procedure (a cultural thing?). Sure!

Americans, Australians, Canadians and New Zealanders are the best tippers, and no service fee is ever put on their bill!

It is so ingrained in me to tip, that I even tipped in Paris, France, even though I was warned not to. One waiter took real offense, read me the riot act and since I wouldn't take the coins back, (I was mad that he was so offended at that point) he threw them in the street and spat at them (luckily not at me!).

Tipping is fun!

Apo
Last edited by Apoclima on Fri Apr 22, 2005 1:11 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby Apoclima » Fri Apr 22, 2005 12:49 am

Sorry I missed this the first time around, Iterman!

Iterman:
....you will get tip as the top of the sum or the tip of it so the servant can get tipsy (or maybe it's the the other way around).


Pretty funny!

Apo
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Postby uncronopio » Fri Apr 22, 2005 2:25 am

Tipping is not common in Australia, except for fancy restaurants. I would rather prefer to have decent salaries from a start including in the prices over tipping at customers' discretion.

It is interesting that tipping only seems to be common in restaurants. Have you ever received a tip for doing your job well? I haven't. At most I get 'thanks for the analyses, good job'. So why the tipping in the restaurant industry?
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Postby KatyBr » Fri Apr 22, 2005 2:32 am

I've received tips in non-tipping industries, sometimes it can seem to be an insult, but hey, money is money, you just get over it.

Katy
My daughter who made more money that you can shake a stick at, on Rodeo Drive as a "professional deli waitress" used to bring home over $100.00 a day on a bad day, just in tips. She is a Pharmacy tech now and wondering how she can handle the pay cut. She made me promise to over-tip everywhere I go, so I do...
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Postby Apoclima » Fri Apr 22, 2005 3:16 am

uncronopio:
Tipping is not common in Australia, except for fancy restaurants.


Interesting! But they must understand the concept, I haven't heard much about their lack of thoughtfulness in this area.

An(ne) Aussie in America

I know that when bus loads of Australians (usually soccer related) came into Seville, word quickly spread and my friends (Spanish and American) and I would just meet at my house (I had the biggest house) and not go out until the bus left!

Apo
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Postby anders » Fri Apr 22, 2005 6:43 am

Iterman wrote:My theory (for what it's worth) is a little different. Compare with other languages as French pour boire (for drink), German Trinkgeld (drink money) and Swedish dricks (dricka -> drink) and you will get tip as the top of the sum or the tip of it so the servant can get tipsy (or maybe it's the the other way around). :) :) :) :)

If not outright tipsy, perhaps enough for a small tipple.

Simple rule of thumb: If a non-technical word is explained as an acronym, it probably is not. One example is "spa", which often is explained as Sanitas Per Acqua, health through water. In all probability, the real story is that it refers to the famous mineral springs in the resort town Spa in eastern Belgium.
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Postby Brazilian dude » Fri Apr 22, 2005 10:03 am

Or to be more exact Sanitas per aquam (but I've heard Salus per aquam myself, since per is a preposition that requires accusative. What's with me and Latin nowadays?

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Postby gailr » Sat Apr 23, 2005 1:23 pm

uncronopio
It is interesting that tipping only seems to be common in restaurants. Have you ever received a tip for doing your job well? I haven't. At most I get 'thanks for the analyses, good job'. So why the tipping in the restaurant industry?

Tipping is reserved for "service" jobs lacking the glamour and prestige of, say, Law, Medicine, or Certified Public Accounting...

Service-industry jobs--not just restaurants--tend to be low-paying, few-or-no-benefits positions, so satisfied patrons give a little something extra. [Katy is right; some wait staff make fabulous tips. And apoclima is correct that some patrons think the staff is there to be abused.] The concept of paying a living wage sounds good, but would be equally resisted by those who do not want to pay for what the work is actually worth and those who do make enough in tips to enjoy a good living. [Interestingly, employees of "fast food" establishments do not recieve tips, even those which try to create an illusory "dining" ambience.]
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Postby anders » Sat Apr 23, 2005 4:36 pm

Brazilian dude wrote:Or to be more exact Sanitas per aquam (but I've heard Salus per aquam myself, since per is a preposition that requires accusative.

I told you it was wrong, didn't I?
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