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Cursive vs Print

A discussion of the peculiarities of languages and the differences between them.

Postby Sunny » Fri Sep 01, 2006 12:36 pm



I made the mistake of reading your reply as I was sipping my coffee! You make me laugh. Thank you! :lol:
One word frees us of all the weight and pain of life: That word is love. Sophocles (496 BC - 406 BC)
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Postby Huny » Fri Sep 01, 2006 12:45 pm

Sunny wrote:

I made the mistake of reading your reply as I was sipping my coffee! You make me laugh. Thank you! :lol:


You are very welcome. Any time. :D
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Postby Palewriter » Fri Sep 01, 2006 1:00 pm

We, as humans, have spent millenia bringing ourselves out of the woods and caves and into civilization as we know it today. Now, all men want to do is turn right around and go back into said woods and caves and call it "camping". This sets man back a good bit, don't you think? :wink:


My wife loves to camp. At the Hyatt, the Westin, the Hilton, the W. As in so many areas, I defer to her better judgement. I'm perfectly content to leave the woods to the bears.

Incidentally, I've noticed two kinds of male-type campers.

The first brings civilization with him in the form of expensive turbine-driven cooking ranges, a tent city that would put a Crusading Medieval Monarch to shame, a solar-powered 42" flat-screen TV, a nuclear wine cooler, etc. The other kind seems to revert to the life of an agoraphobic bushman, refusing to use matches (even in torrential rain, surrounded by undernourished kids and damp tinder), preparing strange concoctions based on bark and bird-droppings, and sleeping in a hole covered with moss.

While the first blusters that he can conquer nature with money and modern technology, the other smiles slyly in the certain knowledge that, once Armageddon comes, he'll be the only guy around with the knowledge to make a nourishing protein drink out of petrified rabbit $hit.

-- PW
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Postby sluggo » Fri Sep 01, 2006 2:21 pm

Huny wrote:.... Now, all men want to do is turn right around and go back into said woods and caves and call it "camping". This sets man back a good bit, don't you think? :wink:

Huny - I-will-not-be-bear-bait-for-no-man. (Don't-shoot-me-Bailey! :shock: )


Hmm.. the ladies seem a bit tentative about camping.

Sounds hardly bearable, but in our gender's defence, so far as there is one, some among us may occasionally wish to slither back into said woods and caves but not call it "camping", though intense it may be... :wink:

Ah yes, a starlit night with a sip of PW's nuclear wine... an awl hooting in the distance...

--Sluggo, sipping but not spilling a cup of Tim Horton's
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Re: On the subject...

Postby anders » Fri Sep 01, 2006 3:27 pm

eberntson wrote:When I have been to the museum, I have noticed that Sanskrit and Arabic alphabets have many styles. Several of them seem to have a block form and then a cursive form. Am I correct is assuming some forms of these are cursive? Also, I have seem writing from Tibet that has several styles some very cursive like in style.

If you use the OP definition that cursive = connected, "normal" Sanskrit, Arabic and Tibetan are written in cursive scipts. For Hindi, which uses the same script as Sanskrit, and Tibetan, "running hand" for faster writing means no (or at least fewer) connections.

The only case of not having a disconnected variety that I can think of is the Perso-Arabic group -- at least if you don't define the Divehi script as such. For Divehi, also known as Thaana, I have so far seen no connected version.
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Postby skinem » Fri Sep 01, 2006 7:31 pm

Anders, thanks for the links--it helped me understand what you were talking about.
Do you have a link for examples of he "running hand"? I'm having a hard time figuring out how no connections makes for faster writing over one with connections...
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Postby anders » Sat Sep 02, 2006 3:46 pm

I was using "running hand" in a generic sense, instead of "handwriting" -- because we write block letters by hand as well. Anyhow, I thought of the kaithi script, and for a perhaps better known and certainly more widely used today, the Gujarati script (link near the bottom of that page). Not having to write the connecting top line does save time. Kaithi is named after the scribe caste, the Kayasth.
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Postby skinem » Sat Sep 02, 2006 6:48 pm

Thanks for the link, Anders, and I understand what you meant and how it would be faster now.

From handwriting to camping (no thread drift there)---my wife's idea of roughing it before marrying me was Motel 6. She was finally sold when I got here out on an easy backpack trip (I made sure the weather was nice, I packed most of the stuff, and I did the cooking) and she saw the Milky Way from "America's Outback" (eastern Oregon, specifically Steens Mountain) at 10,000 feet; saw cougar and wild horses.

Her first response when friends asked her about it later--"Well, I didn't hate it." She actually went out again! (And we're still married so I guess she didn't hate it.)
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Postby Bailey » Sat Sep 02, 2006 7:43 pm

sluggo wrote:
Huny wrote:.... Now, all men want to do is turn right around and go back into said woods and caves and call it "camping". This sets man back a good bit, don't you think? :wink:

Huny - I-will-not-be-bear-bait-for-no-man. (Don't-shoot-me-Bailey! :shock: )


Hmm.. the ladies seem a bit tentative about camping.

Sounds hardly bearable, but in our gender's defence, so far as there is one, some among us may occasionally wish to slither back into said woods and caves but not call it "camping", though intense it may be... :wink:

Ah yes, a starlit night with a sip of PW's nuclear wine... an awl hooting in the distance...

--Sluggo, sipping but not spilling a cup of Tim Horton's




I know a few Ladies who love camping. Actually with their organizational sjkills and knowing what is needful for the whole family to survive, they make great camping partners.

mark no-huny-bashing Bailey

Today is the first day of the rest of your life, Make the most of it...
kb








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Postby Stargzer » Tue Sep 05, 2006 12:59 am

Huny wrote: . . . The nerve of some men! We, as humans, have spent millenia bringing ourselves out of the woods and caves and into civilization as we know it today. Now, all men want to do is turn right around and go back into said woods and caves and call it "camping". . . .

Huny - I-will-not-be-bear-bait-for-no-man. (Don't-shoot-me-Bailey! :shock: )


I don't remember who said it sometime in the last century, but it seems that Mankind spent thousands of years, if not millions, with indoor cooking and outdoor plumbing, only to end up in the latter half of the 20th Century with indoor plumbing and outdoor cooking. Is this Progress?
Regards//Larry

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Postby shacolourdes » Sun Dec 23, 2007 12:49 pm

Stargzer wrote:Japanese uses three types of writing, according to Wikipedia:

The Japanese language is written with a combination of three different types of glyphs: Chinese characters (called kanji), and two syllabic scripts, hiragana and katakana. The Latin alphabet (called rōmaji) is also often used in modern Japanese, especially for things such as company names, advertising, and when inputting Japanese into a computer. Western style Arabic numerals are generally used for numbers, but traditional Chinese/Japanese numberings are also commonplace.



But japanese utilizes those characters in such different matters that aren't interchangeable...
Hiragana cannot be used in place of katakana for words like "telebii" because they do not originate in Japan.
It's much more complex than simply three different styles of writing.
Also, hiragana can be exchanged with kanji but not always. It depends on the phrasing, etc.
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there's a recessive "ll" gene somewhere in our DNA.
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Postby eberntson » Thu Jan 03, 2008 1:59 pm

Thank you for all the enlightenment on Sanskrit scripts & cursive. I will have to re-read the whole thread.

@Huny: I seriously doubt camping is really at the root of all the problems between the sexes. I would think “the MALL”, “TV”, and professional sports have more to do with it.

About camping, my father always said that to see the true metal of a person you should take them camping. He meant this primarily in qualifying women as potential partners (usually after 4 to 6 months of dating, weather permiting), but I have found it really works on testing yourself & others. Traveling together staying in Motel 6 or luxury resorts is an interesting enough test of interpersonal relationships. If you can't travel well with someone you probably shouldn't travel with them. But camping is truly a test for all concerned. It lets one examine the planning ability of people. Examine there expectations of a trip. And lets you see what they see as the "bear necessities." Also, camping can be quite boring if people are not compatible or vapid. My favorite is it allows you to see what the breaking point is, or how quickly the people concerned will call it a day.

@Sunny: How long had you been dating that fella? How did he explain the exercise to you?

~E

PS I have done quite a bit of camping of various sorts, I am only a minimalist if I am carrying everything, and nuclear powered hooch coolers are not necessary. TV is VERBOTTEN :!: , & only a emergency radio is allowed. :wink:
EBERNTSON
Fear less, hope more;
eat less, chew more;
whine less, breathe more;
talk less, say more,
and all good things will be yours.
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Postby Stargzer » Thu Jan 03, 2008 9:00 pm

Based on your avatar you should blend in nicely with the trees ...

:lol:
Regards//Larry

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Postby Perry Lassiter » Thu Feb 23, 2012 7:47 pm

Anyone remember this old thread? Fascinating! As a typical example of these forums, it meanders from cursive v print to middle eastern and oriental languages, and slides home with conversations on camping! Some of the posters are still with us, but several fascinating contributors have disappeared. Do they still lurk silently now and then? If so, pop up and say hi somewhere. Oh - one educated Englander several times used "learn" as synonymous with "teach." Here it's a joke for someone speaking hillbilly. on another post recently I commented my hatred of handwriting as painful. Several on here agreed with me. But no one mentioned having the experience I did when I found my wife's shorthand book. If you can write that fast, why don't they can the alphabet and just teach Gregg or something?
pl
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Postby Philip Hudson » Fri Feb 24, 2012 1:24 am

The truth of shorthand may be in the eye of the writer. I do not write shorthand but my wife is from a family of professional shorthand writers. They write it because it is fast, but in time it becomes a secret script known only to the writer. That is why the court reporter transcribes his shorthand to typewritten pages as soon as possible.

As for cursive writing of Roman letters, I learned it painfully. Then I discovered that I nor anyone else could read my writing. Now I rarely write with pen and paper, but when I do, I print my letters. I am just as fast as I am in cursive and much more legible.

Then there are cursive type fonts. Deliver me from them.
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