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Myroblites

A discussion of word histories and origins.

Myroblites

Postby eberntson » Thu Feb 07, 2008 10:49 am

...Saints who are technically known as Myroblites from those relics exude balm and aromatic ichors.


I found this word in a rather obscure book, it actually has the Greek spelling next to it, so it is probably Greek and from the Greek Orthodox Church. Is there an English equivalent? Or a Catholic Church equivalent. Obviously it deals with Saints and the categorization of Saint, miracles, & their relics.

Any other references on how churches categorize miracles?

~E:-)
EBERNTSON
Fear less, hope more;
eat less, chew more;
whine less, breathe more;
talk less, say more,
and all good things will be yours.
--R. Burns
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Postby gailr » Thu Feb 07, 2008 4:47 pm

eberntson, where did you find your quote?

I was surprised to find it online in a document whose page title was M. Summers - the Vampire. His kith and kin (chap. II suite).

-gailr
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Postby eberntson » Thu Feb 07, 2008 6:31 pm

@gailr: Yes you caught me, I am rereading one of the strangest books I ever read in college. Montague Summers wrote many a witty tome, translated plays, and a number of tomes on the occult and folklore. His command of the English language is inspiring. I have never written down so many words to look up in my life.

The only down side is he has pages of quotes in the original French, Latin, Greek, & German. Unless you are fluent many page in this tome will be ... let's just say alot of mumbling to yourself "it's Greek to me."
EBERNTSON
Fear less, hope more;
eat less, chew more;
whine less, breathe more;
talk less, say more,
and all good things will be yours.
--R. Burns
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eberntson
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Posts: 362
Joined: Thu Feb 10, 2005 10:48 am
Location: Boston, Mass


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