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English words with Latin roots in ferre

A discussion of word histories and origins.

Postby anders » Sun Apr 24, 2005 11:07 am

Neither do I find anybody daring to take the root further back than Latin, or having theories on a possible loan. There is no Sanskrit word for "local" or similar using an l or even r in the beginning. So, let's provisionally blame it on the Etruscans.
Irren ist männlich
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Postby Flaminius » Sun Apr 24, 2005 11:24 am

Quintilianus also has stlites for lites (litigation). Any idea where this leads to?
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Postby badandy » Tue Oct 25, 2005 12:43 pm

as long as were talking about archaic etymologies:
the PIE root for death is *mrot i believe, as evidenced in 'mors' in latin and 'amrot' (i think, somebody know this one?) in sanskrit. But death appears as 'thanos, thanatos' in Greek except for one word. The food of the Gods made them im-mortal, without death, (without= a-) surfacing as
a-mrot-ia = Ambrosia
Habentne Gallinae Talones Acerbos?
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Postby anders » Wed Oct 26, 2005 4:29 am

badandy wrote:the PIE root for death is

*mer- according to the M. Heritage dict. of IE roots. Sanskrit for 'immortal' is amaras or amartyas.
Ambrosia

or 'nectar' is a common translation of Skt. am.rta (the .r is a vowel). This word is alive in Hindi as am.rt, with the added meaning 'any pleasant drink'. For Sikhs, amrit also is the sugary water used in naming and initiation cermonies.
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