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Hudibrastic

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Hudibrastic

Postby miku. » Sun Apr 17, 2005 3:34 am

Hu·di·bras·tic
Pronunciation: "hyü-d&-'bras-tik
Function: adjective
Etymology: irregular from Hudibras, satirical poem by Samuel Butler died 1680
1 : written in humorous octosyllabic couplets
2 : MOCK-HEROIC


Perhaps many of you already knew this word: but I found it amusing :wink:
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Postby Brazilian dude » Sun Apr 17, 2005 10:05 am

Well, I didn't.

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Postby KatyBr » Sun Apr 17, 2005 3:59 pm

cool word Miku, thanks for posting it, and welcome!
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Postby Apoclima » Sun Apr 17, 2005 5:55 pm

I found some excerpts:

Hudibras, satirical poem by Samuel Butler

A wight he was, whose very sight would
Entitle him Mirror of Knighthood;
That never bent his stubborn knee
To any thing but Chivalry;


Seems a bit stilted to me! Intentional or laziness!

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Postby anders » Mon Apr 18, 2005 4:09 am

On a "Hudibras" in Denmark in the fourties, look at http://www.lambiek.net/cosper.htm.
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Hudibrastic

Postby Dr. Goodword » Fri Apr 29, 2005 4:00 pm

I rather like it myself. However, its story isn't very rich and has a rather narrow application.
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Re: Hudibrastic

Postby miku. » Sat Apr 30, 2005 3:26 am

Dr. Goodword wrote:I rather like it myself. However, its story isn't very rich and has a rather narrow application.


True: I found it in a english translation of Arno Schmidt, Scenes from the Life of a Faun: originally the word was "bramarbasieren", from "Bramarbas", with similar meaning.
What about the Schmidt's reception in England and USA?
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Postby KatyBr » Sat Apr 30, 2005 11:03 am

I think we should all begin to use this word immediatly so it enters the lexicon of millions overnight, But please apply whatever definition you wish so that mass-confusion abounds. I will use it as an extension of Hubris... you use it otherwise, perhaps it could be Fortinbras younger brother!

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