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Salad

A discussion of word histories and origins.

Postby LukeJavan8 » Wed Feb 03, 2010 11:17 am

beck123 wrote:
Slava wrote:
saparris wrote:Rape is a leafy green vegetable, much like spinach.
It's also the leftovers from squishing grapes to make wine.


The more commonly-used word for the grape leftovers is "must," and its presence or absence in the subsequent steps of wine-making are very influential in the outcome of the product. Without must, for example, our red wines would not be red, because the greatest part of the red color is derived from the skins. Even some champagnes are actually made with red grapes, minus the must.



Must, souse, rape: all are new to me for pickling, grapes
and preservatives. Must be the area in which I live.
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Postby saparris » Wed Feb 03, 2010 12:19 pm

Drink margaritas and you can get soused and salted at the same time.
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Postby LukeJavan8 » Wed Feb 03, 2010 2:26 pm

Lost my shaker of salt in margaritaville.
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Postby saparris » Wed Feb 03, 2010 4:22 pm

That's wishful thinking. You're preserved in snow and ice.
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Postby LukeJavan8 » Wed Feb 03, 2010 6:52 pm

Just quoting the old song. And as for snow and ice,
it does preserve things, but many don't deserve it.
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Postby beck123 » Wed Feb 03, 2010 9:51 pm

beck123 wrote:
Slava wrote:How booze entered the picture, i do not know. Last I knew, it wasn't particularly salty. Liquid, yes. Salty, no.


Vinegar was a common alternative to salt for preserving foods...


With today's freezers, heat treatments and hermetic sealing of containers, there is little actual need for pickling, but it is still quite common, because people have become familiar with and desirous of the flavors generated by the process. I believe that today, most Americans do not think of salt when they think of pickling. Sauerkraut, some fish (cod, salmon) and pork (in some areas of the country) are still salt-cured, but most "pickled" products today are processed in a mix of vinegar, salt, and pickling spices. Both the salt and vinegar content of today's more common "pickled" goods (and I mean commercial products) have been reduced to such a degree that a jar of pickles bears the warning "refrigerate after opening."

Also, I've only heard of "souse" as boiled, chopped, and pickled secondary meats, usually but not always bound in gelatin. I've looked briefly on the internet and found no "souse" recipes but for this kind of souse. I'd like to see the kind of salt-cured recipes Slava has mentioned, because I'm a flavor craver, and I'm always looking for different foods to try.
Beck

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Postby saparris » Thu Feb 04, 2010 1:49 pm

Speaking of pickled items, what to call them where you live?

Pickled peaches or peach pickles?
Pickled beets or beet pickles?
Etc.
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Postby LukeJavan8 » Thu Feb 04, 2010 2:06 pm

Beet preserves and peach preserves.
That's what we call them.
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Postby LukeJavan8 » Thu Feb 04, 2010 2:07 pm

beck123 wrote:
beck123 wrote:
Slava wrote:How booze entered the picture, i do not know. Last I knew, it wasn't particularly salty. Liquid, yes. Salty, no.


Vinegar was a common alternative to salt for preserving foods...


With today's freezers, heat treatments and hermetic sealing of containers, there is little actual need for pickling, but it is still quite common, because people have become familiar with and desirous of the flavors generated by the process. I believe that today, most Americans do not think of salt when they think of pickling. Sauerkraut, some fish (cod, salmon) and pork (in some areas of the country) are still salt-cured, but most "pickled" products today are processed in a mix of vinegar, salt, and pickling spices. Both the salt and vinegar content of today's more common "pickled" goods (and I mean commercial products) have been reduced to such a degree that a jar of pickles bears the warning "refrigerate after opening."

gelatin. I've looked briefly on the internet and found no "souse" recipes but for this kind of souse. I'd like to see the kind of salt-cured recipes Slava has mentioned, because I'm a flavor craver, and I'm always looking for different foods to try.



It is also called "head cheese": brains, ears and other
pickled things in a gelatinous mass.
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Postby beck123 » Thu Feb 04, 2010 10:32 pm

Souse and head cheese are pretty much the same thing now, but I think head cheese was originally made mostly with glands. Pigs have large thymus glands, and I think that's what was originally used.
Beck

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Postby LukeJavan8 » Fri Feb 05, 2010 11:49 am

There is a sort of "festival" here, where many
people with old family recipes, have a fête featuring
headcheese. Some still call it souse, I have a friend
who does. I still cannot get close to it, though I
am told, it is delicious. I am not a finicky eater, just
have trouble with this stuff.
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Postby saparris » Fri Feb 05, 2010 12:04 pm

Spread it on a peanut butter and jelly sandwich.
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Postby LukeJavan8 » Fri Feb 05, 2010 12:29 pm

Way to go!
Way to ruin my lunch.
Have you ever eaten it?????
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Postby saparris » Fri Feb 05, 2010 12:44 pm

Never eaten it.

And it's not time for lunch yet. You'll get over the idea before then.
Last edited by saparris on Fri Feb 05, 2010 12:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby LukeJavan8 » Fri Feb 05, 2010 12:48 pm

I don't follow the strict rules for Breakfast,Brunch,
Lunch,Dinner/Supper, Tea, Supper/Dinner, Lunch/Supper,
Dinner/Lunch, Snack that you suthreners follow.
I eat when I am hungry, time has nuthin' to do with it.
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