Alphadictionary.com

Our Sponsors

Technical Translation
Website Translation Clip Art
 

Your opinion . . . ?

You have words - now what do you do with them?

Postby saparris » Tue Feb 09, 2010 11:05 pm

Here are the shoes in question. Don't like them? Don't buy any.

Image
Ars longa, vita brevis
User avatar
saparris
Senior Lexiterian
 
Posts: 767
Joined: Fri Jan 22, 2010 5:33 pm
Location: South Carolina USA

Postby Enigma » Wed Feb 10, 2010 12:12 am

I think they are groovy, just perfect for a man of your stature. They match your eyes too.
What you see, yet can not see over, is as good as infinite. ~Thomas Carlyle
Enigma
Lexiterian
 
Posts: 194
Joined: Sat Feb 06, 2010 7:26 pm
Location: New Zealand

Postby saparris » Wed Feb 10, 2010 12:19 am

Actually, I think they match yours after you've been out on the town.
Ars longa, vita brevis
User avatar
saparris
Senior Lexiterian
 
Posts: 767
Joined: Fri Jan 22, 2010 5:33 pm
Location: South Carolina USA

Postby Slava » Wed Feb 10, 2010 12:19 am

So, is that dark line near the upper edge a plimsoll line? Or are these simply plimsolls?
Life is like playing chess with chessmen who each have thoughts and feelings and motives of their own.
User avatar
Slava
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 4755
Joined: Thu Sep 28, 2006 9:31 am
Location: Finger Lakes, NY

Postby Enigma » Wed Feb 10, 2010 12:23 am

saparris wrote:Actually, I think they match yours after you've been out on the town.


Me? Going out on the town, drinking too much, causing havoc, staying up 'til the wee hours?

Yea, that sounds about right.
What you see, yet can not see over, is as good as infinite. ~Thomas Carlyle
Enigma
Lexiterian
 
Posts: 194
Joined: Sat Feb 06, 2010 7:26 pm
Location: New Zealand

Postby saparris » Wed Feb 10, 2010 12:25 am

I think Converse calls it an accent stripe, being that the company has a basketball background rather than a nautical one.
Ars longa, vita brevis
User avatar
saparris
Senior Lexiterian
 
Posts: 767
Joined: Fri Jan 22, 2010 5:33 pm
Location: South Carolina USA

Postby saparris » Wed Feb 10, 2010 12:26 am

Me? Going out on the town, drinking too much, causing havoc, staying up 'til the wee hours?

Yea, that sounds about right.


New forum. Same 88.
Ars longa, vita brevis
User avatar
saparris
Senior Lexiterian
 
Posts: 767
Joined: Fri Jan 22, 2010 5:33 pm
Location: South Carolina USA

Postby Enigma » Wed Feb 10, 2010 7:40 am

saparris wrote:I think Converse calls it an accent stripe, being that the company has a basketball background rather than a nautical one.


And you call yourself a grammar whizz. You should no better, Sap, than to use nonstandard phrases like 'being that.' I'll let you off this time, only if you turn a blind eye to all my mistakes--mistakes I prefer to call lapses LOL.

New forum. Same 88.


I'm actually changing. I have a strong desire not to look like a skinny pole with a large bump at its midsection--like most of the Kiwis who partake in the binge-drinking culture we have here.
What you see, yet can not see over, is as good as infinite. ~Thomas Carlyle
Enigma
Lexiterian
 
Posts: 194
Joined: Sat Feb 06, 2010 7:26 pm
Location: New Zealand

Postby saparris » Wed Feb 10, 2010 8:57 am

And you call yourself a grammar whizz. You should no better, Sap, than to use nonstandard phrases like 'being that.' I'll let you off this time, only if you turn a blind eye to all my mistakes--mistakes I prefer to call lapses LOL.


Of all people, you should recognize the difference between "being that" as a non-standard colloquialism and a grammatically correct occurrence of the same phrase.

Consider the following:

"Being"...is often employed in an absolute construction attached to a complete sentence. As such, it is acceptable. For instance, we might write: "The legislators went ahead and passed the measure, the expectation BEING that they knew the governor would veto the bill in any case."

My sentence was a reduced form of "I think Converse calls it an accent stripe. [The reason] being [is] that the company has a basketball background rather than a nautical one.

But being as how you're working on not being a stick with a bump in the middle, I'll overlook your criticism.
Ars longa, vita brevis
User avatar
saparris
Senior Lexiterian
 
Posts: 767
Joined: Fri Jan 22, 2010 5:33 pm
Location: South Carolina USA

Postby LukeJavan8 » Wed Feb 10, 2010 12:32 pm

Don't forget, 88, he blames all the mistakes on the
typing< typos he calls them.>

and the red shoes don't help, in fact since he has one
foot already in the nether regions, at least the color
matches.
-----please, draw me a sheep-----
User avatar
LukeJavan8
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 3521
Joined: Fri Oct 09, 2009 6:16 pm
Location: Land of the Flat Water

Postby Enigma » Wed Feb 10, 2010 5:30 pm

My sentence was a reduced form of "I think Converse calls it an accent stripe. [The reason] being [is] that the company has a basketball background rather than a nautical one.


This wouldn't be a absolute construction though, because you have a finite verb. I just saw 'being that' an unspeakable synonym for 'because' or 'since.'

But being as how you're working on not being a stick with a bump in the middle, I'll overlook your criticism.


It's harder than you think.
What you see, yet can not see over, is as good as infinite. ~Thomas Carlyle
Enigma
Lexiterian
 
Posts: 194
Joined: Sat Feb 06, 2010 7:26 pm
Location: New Zealand

Postby saparris » Wed Feb 10, 2010 6:23 pm

This wouldn't be an absolute construction though, because you have a finite verb. I just saw 'being that' as an unspeakable synonym for 'because' or 'since.'


I knew that it wasn't an absolute, but the reference I quoted was the only one I could locate regarding a grammatically correct form of "being that."

As a Southerner, I have heard people say things like "being that you're already here, you might as well stay and eat supper."

And being that you brung it up in the first place, I just had to teach you a lesson.
Ars longa, vita brevis
User avatar
saparris
Senior Lexiterian
 
Posts: 767
Joined: Fri Jan 22, 2010 5:33 pm
Location: South Carolina USA

Postby Enigma » Wed Feb 10, 2010 6:27 pm

I'm seeing my first signs of your being a disgruntled teacher, and I'm not liking it, one bit. :wink:
What you see, yet can not see over, is as good as infinite. ~Thomas Carlyle
Enigma
Lexiterian
 
Posts: 194
Joined: Sat Feb 06, 2010 7:26 pm
Location: New Zealand

Postby LukeJavan8 » Wed Feb 10, 2010 6:35 pm

Latin has an ablative absolute, if that is any help.
-----please, draw me a sheep-----
User avatar
LukeJavan8
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 3521
Joined: Fri Oct 09, 2009 6:16 pm
Location: Land of the Flat Water

Postby saparris » Wed Feb 10, 2010 6:46 pm

I'm seeing my first signs of your being a disgruntled teacher, and I'm not liking it, one bit.


I'm not disgruntled. In fact, I am extremely gruntled--and a smart alec as well.
Last edited by saparris on Wed Feb 10, 2010 7:06 pm, edited 1 time in total.
Ars longa, vita brevis
User avatar
saparris
Senior Lexiterian
 
Posts: 767
Joined: Fri Jan 22, 2010 5:33 pm
Location: South Carolina USA

PreviousNext

Return to Grammar

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 1 guest