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Aceldama

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Aceldama

Postby sardith » Tue Mar 23, 2010 11:43 am

I have a question, am not sure if this is the correct format, and am hoping that someone can help me out. I am wanting to know how to find out if a root word ever resulted in a current English word or words.

The curiosity began when I was reading about the 'field of blood', or Aceldama, [Aramaic origin], which was the property purchased by Judas with the payment received for betraying Jesus Christ, and wondered if it could be connected to the contemporary phrase, 'blood money', or some other word with similar meaning that I am not aware of.

Can anyone help me out, because my Googling skills have been exhausted on this?

Thanks,
Susan :)
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Postby Slava » Tue Mar 23, 2010 4:38 pm

You've probably already seen this, or something like it, but here goes anyway:

Aceldama
the name which the Jews gave in their proper tongue, i.e., in Aramaic, to the field which was purchased with the money which had been given to the betrayer of our Lord. The word means "field of blood." It was previously called "the potter's field" (Matt. 27:7, 8; Acts 1:19), and was appropriated as the burial-place for strangers. It lies on a narrow level terrace on the south face of the valley of Hinnom. Its modern name is Hak ed-damm.
http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/aceldama

Another source I have at home adds to this, positing that it might also be named the field of blood because that is where Judas is said to have committed suicide. He didn't buy the land himself, rather it was bought with the money he was paid and returned in his remorse.

I'm not aware of it being used in any other way except as the place name.

Hope this helps.

By the way, you wondered where you might better have posted the original. I'd have gone for the Languages or Etymology sections, for what it's worth.
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Aceldama

Postby sardith » Wed Mar 24, 2010 10:35 am

Thank you.

I have just found it difficult to research certain words that pop up when I read my Bible or other related books, I guess because of their age, for instance, I ran into this word, 'tirred', and still don't have a good explanation of what it means. It was used, if I recall correctly, in reference to a roof. When I Google it, the computer understandably thinks I mean 'tired', or some music band who has that name.

Do you know how to look up archaic words?

Susan
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Re: Aceldama

Postby Slava » Wed Mar 24, 2010 1:12 pm

sardith wrote:I have just found it difficult to research certain words that pop up when I read my Bible or other related books, I guess because of their age, for instance, I ran into this word, 'tirred', and still don't have a good explanation of what it means. It was used, if I recall correctly, in reference to a roof. When I Google it, the computer understandably thinks I mean 'tired', or some music band who has that name.

Do you know how to look up archaic words?

Susan
I'm wondering if maybe your "tirred" isn't a misspelling, or old spelling, of "tiered," as in layered. Some of it depends on the age of the book. Check other versions of the same book and see if the same word appears there. If it's a translation, often someone else has come up with a different way of phrasing, and that can clear things up.

As to looking up archaic words, if you don't mind paying for it, go to one of the book sites and do a search for "dictionary of archaic words".

One other good place to start, though it didn't help this time, is http://www.etymonline.com , an excellent etymology site.
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Aceldama

Postby sardith » Wed Mar 24, 2010 3:10 pm

Thanks for all the good advice.

Since in this case, the book in question is a Wuest translation of the New Testament, and the word 'tirred' referred to a 'roof', it is quiet reasonable that it could be a spelling issue, and the word could be 'tiered', as you suggest. Anyway, it didn't affect my understanding of the verse in question in any major way, it was just one of those things where I saw a word that I did not know, and it piqued my curiosity. I'm sure you know how that goes. :wink:

Have a nice day. :)
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Postby LukeJavan8 » Fri Mar 26, 2010 1:04 pm

I've checked it with a number of my scripture sources, and
they all think it is a typo.
Glad you asked it, though, gave me a chance to explore.
-----please, draw me a sheep-----
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Aceldama

Postby sardith » Fri Mar 26, 2010 2:15 pm

Thanks for all your good work and for taking the time.

Have a wonderful weekend after a job well done! :D
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Postby LukeJavan8 » Fri Mar 26, 2010 4:39 pm

I was a tour guide many tiimes in Israel. Had to know
scripture and really enjoy it. Thanks.
-----please, draw me a sheep-----
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