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Apodictic

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Apodictic

Postby Audiendus » Sun Aug 01, 2010 5:43 pm

Apodictic (adjective)

1. Absolutely certain, true beyond any doubt, logically necessary.
2. Relating to something absolutely certain.

Examples:
It is an apodictic truth that 2+2=4.
Although I assume that the world is real, this is not apodictic; my whole life could be a dream.
"I think, therefore I exist" is an apodictic argument.
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Postby Slava » Wed Aug 04, 2010 8:33 am

This reminds me of the Descartesjoke posted here a couple of years back.
Life is like playing chess with chessmen who each have thoughts and feelings and motives of their own.
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Postby Audiendus » Wed Aug 04, 2010 9:31 am

Good joke. "René Descartes" literally means "born again from the cards", so he presumably reappeared.

Incidentally, Descartes is the only proper noun I can think of that starts with a different letter from its related adjective (Cartesian).
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Postby LukeJavan8 » Thu Aug 05, 2010 12:31 pm

Cartesian: most interesting. I've been thinking on this
and I must concur.
-----please, draw me a sheep-----
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apodictic

Postby sardith » Fri Jul 15, 2011 1:00 pm

Audiendus~I just saw this word today on a word-of-the-day site, and I had a question.

Apodictic:

1. Absolutely certain, true beyond any doubt, logically necessary.

Of this #1 definition, I understand everything except the 'logically necessary' part. Could you give me an example of what that means, please.

Thanks,
Sardith :)
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~Mark Twain, [pen name for Samuel Clemens], American author and humorist, (1835-1910)~
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Postby Perry Lassiter » Fri Jul 15, 2011 4:36 pm

In Biblical studies scholars distinguish between apodictic and casuistic. Apodictic are curt: no murder, no stealing. Casuistic law is case law. There is a difference between raping a single woman and a slave, for example, and the penalties vary.
pl
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Re: apodictic

Postby Audiendus » Fri Jul 15, 2011 8:37 pm

sardith wrote:Of this #1 definition, I understand everything except the 'logically necessary' part. Could you give me an example of what that means, please.

If something is logically necessary, it is true not just in this world but in all possible worlds, even imaginary ones.

For example, in the real world a person cannot live forever (it is physically necessary that they die), but it is possible to imagine or dream of a magical world in which people never die. However, "3 is more than 2" is logically necessary; it is impossible to imagine a world in which 3 is not more than 2, as the idea is incoherent.
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Postby Slava » Sat Jul 16, 2011 8:54 am

For more on this concept, see Necessary and Sufficient Condition at Wikipedia. There's a decent article on these logic terms.
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apodictic

Postby sardith » Sat Jul 16, 2011 12:32 pm

Thanks, Audiendus, your explanation makes all the difference. 8)

Slava, I read the article on 'Necessary and Sufficient Condition', and am convinced that I must be more of an auditory learner on this subject. I know I am able to comprehend the material, but I am getting nowhere by reading about it. A similar thing happened when I suggested the word, 'syllogism', a while back, and a few of you tried to help me then. Harumph. :P

For now, I will get clobbered by my 'Debate Team Captain' daughter, who hits me with the, "Your argument contains faulty syllogism, Mom," retort, to which I will reply, "Because I'm the Mom, that's why!"

Enjoy your weekend,
Sardith :wink:
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