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Debutant

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Debutant

Postby Slava » Mon Aug 16, 2010 10:17 pm

I just came across what I believe is the first adjectival usage of this noun.

"Most debutant drugs find the market already crowded with similar products, and prices are set by the competition."

Any comments? What do you think of this turn of phrase?


For the curious, the whole article is here.
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Postby saparris » Thu Aug 26, 2010 2:36 pm

Why not?

paper towels
pickle barrel
orange juice
tomato sandwich
dog food
glue stick
car dealer
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Debutant

Postby Audiendus » Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:28 pm

Since -ant is a common adjectival suffix in French-derived words in English, it seems natural to use "debutant" as an adjective. I think I would only apply it to people, though.
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Re: Debutant

Postby Slava » Thu Aug 26, 2010 3:39 pm

Audiendus wrote:Since -ant is a common adjectival suffix in French-derived words in English, it seems natural to use "debutant" as an adjective. I think I would only apply it to people, though.
This is what I had in mind when I posted the query. Debutant has always referred to people, and as a noun, in my world.
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Postby saparris » Thu Aug 26, 2010 4:35 pm

The seemingly incessant formation of debutant clubs in this country is a constant reminder that aberrant thinking is still abundant among the bon vivants who are habitants of the upper class.

Debutant societies, along with the compliant participants in the irrelevant soirees held each year on their behalf, are the repugnant results of overabundant pocketbooks, as well as blatantly arrogant assaults on those "inelegant" young women who are not fortunate enough to be descendants of significant members of society.
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Postby Audiendus » Thu Aug 26, 2010 7:47 pm

saparris wrote:the bon vivants

Those conversant with French grammar will note the flagrant omission of the important (though not sibilant) plural indicant, with the resultant failure to make the adjective concordant with the noun.

They will, however, be cognisant of the writer's nationality, and therefore reluctant to criticise him. Their constant admiration of his radiant prose and trenchant views will make them tolerant of any errant spelling.
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Postby saparris » Thu Aug 26, 2010 8:18 pm

This writer's dictionary (Webster's Ninth New Collegiate, also known as A Collection of Odd Spelling and Usage from the Colonies) provides two plurals for bon vivant: bon vivants and bons vivants.

Nonetheless, I realise that I am gravely deficient in French plurals (as well as British English), which does not work in my favour when my writing is analysed by readers from other countries, who often criticise my prose as severely as one does a bad theatre production. Please forgive me whilst I go away and eat worms.

p.s. I ever been a vivant, bon or otherwise.
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Postby bnjtokyo » Mon Aug 30, 2010 2:18 am

Feb 2 2008
Garmin . . . decided to enter into the race . . . and its debutant product is . . . unveiled early this week.

Use of "debutant" as an adjective to identify a person who is doing a certain job of the first time is I think fairly common:
Nov 4 2006
''One of the best compliments that I as a director received . . . '' the debutant director added.

Also "debutant" as an adjective to mean something for debutants must have been around for awhile "debutant ball"
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