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Luv, wot etc

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Luv, wot etc

Postby Audiendus » Fri Feb 11, 2011 11:49 am

In the UK we sometimes use phonetic spellings to suggest either (a) informality or (b) illiteracy. The two most common examples are probably luv and wot.

Informal
Take it easy, luv.
I luv Jack. [graffiti]
We luv the Queen. [possible tabloid headline]
Wot a cheek! [ditto]
Wot, no beer? [e.g. in World War II army cartoon]

Suggesting illiteracy
"I'm in luv with 'im", she said.
"She was the one wot did it", he protested.

These phonetic spellings (where the pronunciation is standard English) are particularly associated with the London area. Can anyone think of other examples? Any regional British, or American, equivalents?
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Postby Slava » Fri Feb 11, 2011 2:33 pm

Well, in graffiti here in the US we'd probably use a heart sign rather than spell it.

If we're going completely gaga over someone or thing, we do use "wuv."

I'd say we use these two to demonstrate illiteracy in much the same way.

I'm not too up on Brit-speak, but I believe there's "innit." It seems to have several different usages.

From Harry Potter I recall "wotcher," as a greeting. It's not phonetic, though.

Edit: I just came across two others that might serve:

wor for were and Misther for Mister. These both may be more indicative of local or uneducated speak.
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Postby bnjtokyo » Sat Feb 12, 2011 7:25 am

How about "wuz" for "was" as in "I wuz robbed" or "We wuz robbed" which indicates illiteracy both by spelling and syntax.
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Postby Audiendus » Sat Feb 12, 2011 10:46 am

Slava wrote:I'm not too up on Brit-speak, but I believe there's "innit."

Yes - like n'est-ce pas? in French or ¿no es verdad? in Spanish.

Slava wrote:From Harry Potter I recall "wotcher," as a greeting. It's not phonetic, though.

Wotcher or wotcha - originally from "what cheer?".

Slava wrote:wor for were and Misther for Mister. These both may be more indicative of local or uneducated speak.

Never seen "Misther".

bnjtokyo's "wuz" is a good example. There's also "dun" (I never dun it; a whodunit). Another example is the expression 'Nuff said.
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Postby Philip Hudson » Sun Mar 25, 2012 12:00 am

I am a red neck, but there are degrees of red neckism. A cousin from Smith County, Texas (Tyler), once told me, "Ah dun druv uh fur piece n Ah haint et nuttn yit." This should take some kind of prize.

Maybe it will wake up this thread to a subject dear to my heart.
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