caliginous

Use this forum to suggest Good Words for Professor Beard.
Pattie
Junior Lexiterian
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Joined: Wed Oct 06, 2010 5:26 pm

caliginous

Postby Pattie » Thu Dec 08, 2011 4:32 am

I found this lovely word in Alan Hollinghurst's The Stranger's Child. How exciting it is to find a word with which one is unfamiliar!
PattieT

Perry Lassiter
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Postby Perry Lassiter » Thu Dec 08, 2011 1:25 pm

Dang! You made me go look it up to find it means dark, dim, or obscure. One ref added misty to the mix, as in a caliginous atmosphere. Couldn't discover whether the g is hard or soft, though.
pl

Audiendus
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caliginous

Postby Audiendus » Sat Dec 10, 2011 12:27 pm

Perry Lassiter wrote:Couldn't discover whether the g is hard or soft, though.

It is soft (i.e. pronounced "j"). Latin-derived words (as this is) usually have soft g before e or i, whereas Germanic-derived words (such as get and give) have hard g.

Perry Lassiter
Grand Panjandrum
Posts: 3035
Joined: Wed Jan 03, 2007 12:41 pm
Location: RUSTON, LA
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Postby Perry Lassiter » Sat Dec 10, 2011 2:24 pm

Why the ambiguity in Spanish? Gente vs gato?
pl


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