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Ebonics

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Ebonics

Postby cnichol » Mon Dec 19, 2011 6:46 pm

What is the history of the word "Ebonics", which my friend uses to describe the African-American dialect of English she speaks as a native of Washington, DC?
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Postby Perry Lassiter » Mon Dec 19, 2011 11:00 pm

The dictionaries agree that it showed up in print around 1973, and it's a combination of ebony and phonics. One said it was mildly offensive, but I think that would depend on the context. It's also referred to as African-American Vernacular speech. A book by that title was published in 1975. I find it interesting that your friend who speaks that lingo would use the term.
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Postby cnichol » Thu Dec 22, 2011 11:58 am

Yes, my colleague uses the term all the time in reference to what she speaks with her family and friends outside of the work place. This is the first time I have heard that is can be offensive to some people, which is good for me to know. Thanks.
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Postby LukeJavan8 » Fri Jan 06, 2012 1:55 pm

Definitely offensive. Those using it use words that
others are not allowed to use as they are considered
offensive to ebonic speakers when used by non-ebonic
peoples.
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Ebonics

Postby Philip Hudson » Thu Jan 12, 2012 11:30 am

This is true LukeJavan8.

An Ebonics speaker can use the "n" word with impunity. He/she can call any one an "n" word. If you are not an Ebonics speaker, and only certain people are allowed to speak Ebonics, then saying the "n" word is a definite racial slur. I never say the "n" word and wouldn't if I were allowed to speak Ebonics, but the double standard is strange. I don't want to speak Ebonics and wonder why anyone would want to. It is in a different class than having a Southern or Yankee accent. Gullah is a different thing. I would love to know how to speak Gullah.
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Postby LukeJavan8 » Fri Jan 13, 2012 2:10 pm

Exactly what I was talking about. The double standard
is curious. Not too familiar with Gulah: speak more.....
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ebonics

Postby Philip Hudson » Fri Jan 20, 2012 2:01 am

For a definition of Gulah see: http://freefactfinder.com/definition/Gulah.html.
Joel Chandler Harris uses a version of Gulah in his Uncle Remus stories. It is surely a modification of Gulah because with a little study most English speakers can get the jist of the Uncle Remus stories.
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Postby LukeJavan8 » Fri Jan 20, 2012 1:46 pm

Your definition with Remus, helps. The site won't open.
But thanks.
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