Alphadictionary.com

Our Sponsors

Technical Translation
Website Translation Clip Art
 

LAPIDATE

Use this forum to discuss past Good Words.

LAPIDATE

Postby Dr. Goodword » Mon Apr 09, 2012 10:38 pm

• lapidate •

Pronunciation: læ-pê-dayt • Hear it!

Part of Speech: Verb, transitive

Meaning: To pelt with stones, to stone (to death)

Notes: This form of capital punishment still occurs today in countries like Afghanistan, Indonesia, Nigeria, and Somalia according to Wikipedia. It is related to a host of words, like lapidary "a gem cutter", lapidation "stone-throwing", and lapidator "stone-thrower". It is also related to the fascinating word lapicide "stone-cutter", not the expected "stone-killer". The combining form -cide comes from the verb cædere "to cut, kill", but is rarely used in the sense of "cut".

In Play: This word is seldom used except in the literal sense: "Muslims who participate in the pilgrimage to Mecca each year perform a ritual Stoning of the Devil." However, we may use it when metaphorically referring to the most horrendous forms of execution: "Phil Anders should be lapidated by her entire family for what he did to June McBride."

Word History: Today's Good Word comes to us directly from lapidatus, the past participle of lapidare "to stone" which, in turn, comes from lapis "a stone". It is related to Greek lepas "crag", but we don't find evidence of it in any other Indo-European language before Greek and Latin. We do know that Latin lapis went on to become Portuguese lápis, Italian lapis, and Spanish lápiz, all of which mean "pencil". This brings us to dilapidated, a combination of Latin dis- "asunder" + lapidare "to throw stones at". So the original meaning of dilapidated was in a state of disrepair as though stoned (in the old sense of the word).
• The Good Dr. Goodword
User avatar
Dr. Goodword
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3486
Joined: Wed Feb 02, 2005 9:28 am
Location: Lewisburg, PA

Postby angebunch » Tue Apr 10, 2012 10:25 am

I thought it odd that the example sentence that was supposed to demonstrate "lapidate's" literal usage didn't use the word at all. I would like to know how it would be used in this sentence. Would the word,"stoning", be replaced by lapidation?
[quote: This word is seldom used except in the literal sense: "Muslims who participate in the pilgrimage to Mecca each year perform a ritual Stoning of the Devil." ][/quote]
In the beginning was the Word and the Word was with God and the Word was God
angebunch
Junior Lexiterian
 
Posts: 8
Joined: Sat Feb 18, 2012 2:52 pm
Location: Ontario

Postby Philip Hudson » Tue Apr 10, 2012 11:25 am

Hello angebunch,

Lapidation is the noun, not a very pleasant word. If you are perfect, you may cast the first stone. Before you throw, check to see if you live in a glass house.

Thank you for your first posting. Welcome to the A+ Bunch, my own translation of Alpha Agora. I’m an old Texan but I love Ontario. I met my lovely wife there some fifty-four years ago.

Philip Hudson
It is dark at night, but the Sun will come up and then we can see.
Philip Hudson
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1707
Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2006 4:41 am
Location: Texas

Postby Perry Lassiter » Tue Apr 10, 2012 5:31 pm

Wond if its related to lapidup, as in if you flattered him he'd lapidup.
pl
Perry Lassiter
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 2308
Joined: Wed Jan 03, 2007 12:41 pm
Location: RUSTON, LA

Postby Slava » Tue Apr 10, 2012 6:08 pm

Perry Lassiter wrote:Wond if its related to lapidup, as in if you flattered him he'd lapidup.
Ow.
User avatar
Slava
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 4591
Joined: Thu Sep 28, 2006 9:31 am
Location: Finger Lakes, NY

Postby angebunch » Tue Apr 10, 2012 9:56 pm

Hi back, Philip Hudson. And thank you for the welcome. I've been enjoying the word-of-the-day for months but this was my first successful forum post. I usually read the word-of-the-day on my iphone and trying to post on the forum requires navigating a lot of very tiny print on the phone screen. My previous attempts left me wanting to lapidate my phone! :wink: Today, I decided to attempt it from my computer - much easier.
In the beginning was the Word and the Word was with God and the Word was God
angebunch
Junior Lexiterian
 
Posts: 8
Joined: Sat Feb 18, 2012 2:52 pm
Location: Ontario

Postby Slava » Tue Apr 10, 2012 10:00 pm

angebunch wrote:My previous attempts left me wanting to lapidate my phone! :wink:
My choice would be to lapidate with the phone.

Welcome to the Agora. Post early, post often and well.
Life is like playing chess with chessmen who each have thoughts and feelings and motives of their own.
User avatar
Slava
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 4591
Joined: Thu Sep 28, 2006 9:31 am
Location: Finger Lakes, NY

Postby LukeJavan8 » Wed Apr 11, 2012 11:08 am

Likewise, to piggyback on the above folks: WELCOME.
-----please, draw me a sheep-----
User avatar
LukeJavan8
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 3424
Joined: Fri Oct 09, 2009 6:16 pm
Location: Land of the Flat Water

Arggh!

Postby Dr. Goodword » Wed Apr 11, 2012 10:49 pm

I and my editors completely missed my use of stoning rather than lapidate in the examples. I have repaired it now in the archives to: "Muslims who participate in the pilgrimage to Mecca each year perform a ritual in which they symbolically lapidate the Devil." I apologize for the oversight.
• The Good Dr. Goodword
User avatar
Dr. Goodword
Site Admin
 
Posts: 3486
Joined: Wed Feb 02, 2005 9:28 am
Location: Lewisburg, PA

Postby bamaboy56 » Thu Apr 12, 2012 12:06 am

Thanks for the inclusion of the word dilapidate. Interesting to think it means to break asunder as if by stoning. In Chile, where I learned to speak Spanish, they use the Spanish word lápiz to mean both pencils AND pens. I thought it was interesting they would use the same word for both types of writing instruments. The writing part of a pencil (referred to as the lead) is actually graphite (not lead), a soft stone or carbon. Now I understand why the Spanish word for pencil comes from a word that means stone. Thanks!
Be who you are and say what you feel in your heart. Because those that matter, don't mind. And those that mind, don't matter.
User avatar
bamaboy56
Lexiterian
 
Posts: 350
Joined: Thu Feb 24, 2011 8:20 pm
Location: The Deep South

Re: Arggh!

Postby Slava » Thu Apr 12, 2012 12:16 am

Dr. Goodword wrote:I and my editors completely missed my use of stoning rather than lapidate in the examples. I have repaired it now in the archives to: "Muslims who participate in the pilgrimage to Mecca each year perform a ritual in which they symbolically lapidate the Devil." I apologize for the oversight.
Apology accepted by all and sundry, I imagine. Lapses and all, the Doc rocks!
Life is like playing chess with chessmen who each have thoughts and feelings and motives of their own.
User avatar
Slava
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 4591
Joined: Thu Sep 28, 2006 9:31 am
Location: Finger Lakes, NY

Postby Philip Hudson » Thu Apr 12, 2012 1:23 am

bamaboy56
I'm not fluent in Spanish, just a little Tex-Mex. In formal Spanish as well as in Tex Mex, a writing pen is called a pluma. This comes from the word feather. In English, a writing pen was once a quill. I haven't heard the use of lápiz for a writing pen.
It is dark at night, but the Sun will come up and then we can see.
Philip Hudson
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1707
Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2006 4:41 am
Location: Texas

Postby LukeJavan8 » Thu Apr 12, 2012 12:00 pm

Philip Hudson wrote:bamaboy56
I'm not fluent in Spanish, just a little Tex-Mex. In formal Spanish as well as in Tex Mex, a writing pen is called a pluma. This comes from the word feather. In English, a writing pen was once a quill. I haven't heard the use of lápiz for a writing pen.



That is interesting, because neither had I, with the little
Spanish I have.
-----please, draw me a sheep-----
User avatar
LukeJavan8
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 3424
Joined: Fri Oct 09, 2009 6:16 pm
Location: Land of the Flat Water

Postby misterdoe » Thu Apr 12, 2012 12:55 pm

I learned lápiz for "pencil" in Spanish classes in school, but have never heard it in speech, probably because people don't generally carry pencils with them. In fact, a coworker of Dominican background, when speaking to a Spaniard on the telephone, reacted to the word lápiz as though it were Klingon, she was so unused to it. (Though it could also have been the speaker's Castilian propriety, since the "colonials" relax the language rules somewhat. :?) And the Peruvian couple I used to rent a room from used lapicero for "pen." :?
Last edited by misterdoe on Fri Apr 13, 2012 12:41 am, edited 1 time in total.
misterdoe
Lexiterian
 
Posts: 336
Joined: Fri Mar 13, 2009 10:21 am
Location: New York City area

Postby Philip Hudson » Thu Apr 12, 2012 4:45 pm

Perhaps lapicero means the new fangled thing that isn't really a pencil but works something like a pencil. Quién sabe.
It is dark at night, but the Sun will come up and then we can see.
Philip Hudson
Grand Panjandrum
 
Posts: 1707
Joined: Thu Feb 23, 2006 4:41 am
Location: Texas

Next

Return to Good Word Discussion

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: No registered users and 9 guests