cwms, crwth, & cwm

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eberntson
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cwms, crwth, & cwm

Postby eberntson » Tue May 22, 2012 12:09 pm

cwms, crwth, & cwm

Yah know that "y" can be used as a consonant or a vowel, but just learned that the Welsh use "w" as a vowel (a "oo" sound). Word that used "w" as a vowel are rare I suppose since I don't think it has ever come up anywhere in my readings.

cwm - (pronounced "koom") is a steep-walled hollow on a hillside. cwm is commonly used in Welsh place names.

crwth - (pronounced "krooth") is a type of stringed instrument.

cwms - of glacial origin are a common feature of Welsh geography.

The question is can I use "cwn" in playing Scrabble? At least I know how to win a bet with a wordnik!
EBERNTSON
Fear less, hope more;
eat less, chew more;
whine less, breathe more;
talk less, say more,
and all good things will be yours.
--R. Burns

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Postby Philip Hudson » Tue May 22, 2012 2:52 pm

Eberntson, thank you for opening this thread. See also the thread for whiskey. Perhaps someone has something Welsh to contribute. Then we can segue to things Manx.
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eberntson
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Postby eberntson » Tue May 22, 2012 5:23 pm

Yes, I posted this under Whiskey for you.
EBERNTSON
Fear less, hope more;
eat less, chew more;
whine less, breathe more;
talk less, say more,
and all good things will be yours.
--R. Burns

Perry Lassiter
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Postby Perry Lassiter » Tue May 22, 2012 9:03 pm

Good to know. I was, however, taught the five vowels ending with "and sometimes y or w." i always assumed the w referred to such unpronounced letters after vowels, e.g. Know or knew - tho if one listens carefully, there is a slight consonantal w wound at the end.
pl

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Postby Slava » Tue May 22, 2012 9:32 pm

Perry Lassiter wrote:Good to know. I was, however, taught the five vowels ending with "and sometimes y or w." i always assumed the w referred to such unpronounced letters after vowels, e.g. Know or knew - tho if one listens carefully, there is a slight consonantal w wound at the end.
Does this mean you don't consider no/know and knew/gnu to be homonyms?
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Postby eberntson » Wed May 23, 2012 9:50 am

Huh. "W" was never mentioned as a vowel in freshman English. That might have made things easier.
EBERNTSON
Fear less, hope more;
eat less, chew more;
whine less, breathe more;
talk less, say more,
and all good things will be yours.
--R. Burns

Perry Lassiter
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Postby Perry Lassiter » Wed May 23, 2012 12:15 pm

Of course they are homonyms. Actually, no and gnu end with the lips moving toward the w sound. Probably most words ending in vowels move toward a consonantal sound. Ah is an exception and ends right there. To me, a long A slides toward a Y. Ax short A may also be open, but if extended slides toward K in back of throat. When I say the long E my tongue wants to end it with a Y. Eh is like ah and a pure sound. Long I wants to go to Y unless I'm doing the southern drawl (ah). Short I is pure. The U in pure begins with PY, but not the sound in poor. There are both individual and regional variations. Try them yourself to see whether you pronounce the same as I or differently.
pl

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Postby eberntson » Wed May 23, 2012 3:18 pm

don't for get "Noh" as in Japanese theater. So we now have no, know, gnu, & noh... dare I say it!? The "Noes" have it. Perry, what about "now"? This breaks with "know" and "no" do it not?
EBERNTSON
Fear less, hope more;
eat less, chew more;
whine less, breathe more;
talk less, say more,
and all good things will be yours.
--R. Burns

Perry Lassiter
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Postby Perry Lassiter » Wed May 23, 2012 4:24 pm

It do indeed. I would rule w in now as a consonant unless you consider it a vowel like OU in our.
pl


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