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Forthy

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Forthy

Postby Slava » Wed May 11, 2011 10:31 pm

A missing GWoTD, from 5/9:

Dr. Goodword wrote:• forthy •

Pronunciation: for-thee • Hear it!

Part of Speech: Adjective

Meaning: 1. Open, affable, and forthcoming in nature. 2. Forward, frank, outspoken, or presumptuous in behavior.

Notes: No, today's Good Word is not a misspelling of frothy, but a distinct adjective based on forth (see Word History). It originates in southwest England, around Devon and Cornwall, but English is spoken there, too, so we are free to use vocabulary from there. The comparative would be forthier and the superlative forthiest, while forthiness would be the noun indicating the quality distinguishing a forthy person.

In Play: Today's word is a good substitute for forthcoming when you are in a hurry and want to shorten things: "I have always found Dorian Seaman forthy on the subject of his marriage—too forthy, if anything." This word is more often used in the pejorative sense of forwardness: "The forthy waster had the cheek to ask my wife for a dance before I had the chance to."

Word History: We can trace this Good Old Word back to a form *per in Proto-Indo-European (PIE), the language from which most Indian and European languages derive. Per meant "forward, before, in front of". It underlies English for and far, with its derivatives farther and further. It is also the origin of English fore found in foreground, foremost, and before. The same PIE root became Old Iranian pairi "around", visible in pairidaeza "a wall around (a garden)". Hebrew borrowed this word as its pardess "citrus orchard". The Greeks, however, wrote so ebulliently of the lushness of Persian gardens that the word entered Greek as paradeisos "paradise", the sense it had when English borrowed it.
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Re: Forthy

Postby Slava » Sun Aug 19, 2012 8:35 pm

Okay, I get the word, but not Dorian Seaman. I know there's a joke in there somewhere, but I can't find it. I'm dense at times. Can anyone clue me in here?
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Re: Forthy

Postby Perry Lassiter » Sun Aug 19, 2012 9:15 pm

More obfuscation: what is a "forthy waster?" I guess a waster is a scoundrel, and the comment means a rascal asked the wife to dance before the husband had a chance. Oh, try dory and seaman.
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Re: Forthy

Postby Jeff hook » Sun Aug 19, 2012 9:18 pm

Beats me, but...

1.
Notes: No, today's Good Word is not a misspelling of frothy, but a distinct adjective based on forth (see Word History). It originates in southwest England, around Devon and Cornwall....


Devon and Cornwall are both coastal counties in southwestern England. Does that explain the "Seaman" surname? (Pirates of Penzance, coastal "wrecking" by the people of Cornwall, false lighthouses to lure ships "astray" onto the rocky coast, etc.)

2. Then there's always the scribbling of Oscar Wilde. Can it fairly be categorized as "perverted"? I'm thinking of "The Picture of Dorian Gray." Wikipedia's references to Dorian's "beauty" seem to put the right "spin" on it:

Wikipedia: What a wonderful resource...

This pun puzzled me when I first saw it. It isn't any clearer to me now...
Last edited by Jeff hook on Sun Aug 19, 2012 10:32 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Forthy

Postby Jeff hook » Sun Aug 19, 2012 9:23 pm

The "dory" and "seaman" idea seems to be good:

Try this.
Last edited by Jeff hook on Sun Aug 19, 2012 10:04 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Forthy

Postby Jeff hook » Sun Aug 19, 2012 9:29 pm

I guess a waster is a scoundrel...


Here are some relevant definitions.
Last edited by Jeff hook on Sun Aug 19, 2012 11:13 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Forthy

Postby Slava » Sun Aug 19, 2012 9:40 pm

Ah, yes, a waster is a wastrel is a form of scoundrel. I get the dory and seaman tie ins, but usually the Good Doctor's names have a humorous aspect to them. Phil Anders, Marian Kind, and so on. What does this one mean?
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Re: Forthy

Postby Jeff hook » Sun Aug 19, 2012 9:53 pm

...usually the Good Doctor's names have a humorous aspect to them.


You expect him to bat 1000?

Anybody know the "code" for replacing mile-long URLs with simple text links, such as is shown in the original GWOTD "posting's" text link: "Hear it!"?

(When I found out how to do this I returned to this "post" to use the technique by hyperlinking my reference to the mp3 link in the original GWOTD message. See the explanation below.)
Last edited by Jeff hook on Sun Aug 19, 2012 11:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Forthy

Postby Jeff hook » Sun Aug 19, 2012 9:58 pm

This time the Doctor may have struck out. He may have "whiffed" with a pun which fell flat. It may only have been "DORY ... AND ... SEAMAN." That may have been all of it. ("Dorian" as a mispronunciation of "Dory And"...)

(Is this an example of metathesis? The same process might be seen in the transformation of "Kit and Caboodle" to a "cute" nickname, "Kitty Caboodle": "Kit and" becomes "Kitten" and that's replaced by "an actual nickname," "Kitty." That's painfully corny, but I'm guessing The Good Doctor may be inflicting a similar "witticism" on us here...)
Last edited by Jeff hook on Tue Aug 21, 2012 7:52 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Forthy

Postby Jeff hook » Sun Aug 19, 2012 10:23 pm

I've got it. Here's the technique. I'll try to enter the actual code enlarged in bold blue and my explanatory text in black. Needless to say, no spaces should be added between the text which you're entering as a hyperlinked substitute for the full "actual" URL and the code, at either end ("fore" or "aft," as Dorian Seaman would put it...):

[url=Enter your "actual url" here]Enter your own text here. It'll be hyperlinked and it'll substitute for the long URL, which will remain "operative" "behind the screen," in the page's source code.[/url]


That's "it." You can see that, in normal HTML fashion, you're merely "bracketing" your hyperlinked text between a starting and an ending HTML "tag" but you're "installing" the "actual working URL" in the first of the two "tags." The first tag is "carrying the payload."
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Re: Forthy

Postby Philip Hudson » Sun Aug 19, 2012 11:58 pm

The Good Doctor says they speak English in Devon and Cornwall. Most do after a fashion, some don't. The Cornish language and culture still hangs on in this corner of England. When an old Cornish man was asked if he had ever been to London, he replied that he had never even been to England. The same is true for Brittany and France. Brittany and Cornwall are renowned for snubbing import/export laws. Cornish men go to Brittany for brides and vice versa. Long live the Celts.
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Re: Forthy and Dorian Seaman

Postby wurdpurrson » Tue Aug 21, 2012 6:33 pm

Perhaps Dorian Seaman is a seaman who operates only a dory, and no other type of boat?
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Re: Forthy

Postby Jeff hook » Tue Aug 21, 2012 7:10 pm

Perhaps Dorian Seaman is a seaman who operates only a dory, and no other type of boat?


Are you saying the name "Dorian" indicates "Only a Dory"? Can you explain that interpretation?

(I should explain that I assume The Good Doctor is only human. I don't think each of his puns can be a rip-roaring success, and I assume this one just didn't make the grade. Your explanation may be consistent with my assumption: You may be suggesting that this isn't a good pun, so the connection of "Dorian" with the idea of only operating a dory may not be clear...)
Last edited by Jeff hook on Tue Aug 21, 2012 8:09 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Dorian Seaman

Postby wurdpurrson » Tue Aug 21, 2012 8:00 pm

Yes, I am suggesting that "dorian" can imply that a person operates only a dory, be it a permanent condition or only temporary, and not another kind of boat. And yes, the Good Doctor is only human and aren't we glad. I personally find this pun a subtle one, a nice counterpoint to his usual blatantly delicious ones. He didn't fail, I think he just threw us a bit of a curve ball, which certainly generated much discussion. Bravo Doc - you must be smiling at our little tempest in a teapot.
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Re: Forthy

Postby Jeff hook » Tue Aug 21, 2012 8:06 pm

Yes, I am suggesting that "dorian" can imply that a person operates only a dory, be it a permanent condition or only temporary, and not another kind of boat.


Well, then lemme stir that pot a little more: HOW does the name "Dorian" "imply that a person operates only a dory," etc? "I don't get it"!
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