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LOQUACIOUS

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LOQUACIOUS

Postby Dr. Goodword » Sat Dec 03, 2011 11:30 pm

• loquacious •


Pronunciation: lo-kway-shês • Hear it!

Part of Speech: Adjective

Meaning: Very talkative, chatty, using lots of words, verbose.

Notes: The noun from today's word is loquacity [lo-qwæ-sê-ti] and the adverb loquaciously. A related adjective is loquent "talking, speaking", which turns up mostly in technical writing as in, "Are chimpanzees a loquent species?" This adjective yields a noun, loquency "talk, the ability to speak". The synonym of today's word, talkative, is an accepted lexical violation in that it is made up of a native stem, talk, plus a Latin suffix -ative, two grammatically incompatible constituents. But perhaps I am waxing loquacious myself and should stop here to leave room for a few other comments on this interesting word.

In Play: Today's word is the antonym of an earlier Good Word, reticent "taciturn, untalkative": "Molly was such a reticent child but since starting school she has become positively loquacious." Loquacity can be fun and entertaining or it can get in the way: "We want to keep today's meeting short, so I may interrupt anyone who becomes too loquacious."

Word History: Today's Good Word comes from a Latin with a similar word meaning, loquax (loquac-s) from loqui "to speak". It derives from the Proto-Indo-European root tolkw-, which apparently metathesized to tlokw-. That placed the [t] in an untenable position (Latin didn't allow the consonant cluster [tl]), so it was dropped. Eloquent and elocution come from eloqui "to speak out" a reduction of ex "out (of)" + loqui "to speak". In Russian we find the PIE root unmetathesized in tolk "sense", whose plural is, oddly, tolki "talk, rumors". Although it looks very much like English talk, the [t] in this stem would have become [th] in English, as the contrast Latin pater - English father shows. Talk probably comes from an original word meaning "count", as does Dutch taal "language". (We are always happy when the talkative Katy Brezger talks to us into running a wonderful word like today's Good Word.)
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Re: LOQUACIOUS

Postby Slava » Sun Sep 16, 2012 7:23 pm

I wonder if the Dr. Seuss character the Lorax is a portmanteau word mixing of loquacious and some other word. He is a rather loquacious critter.
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Re: LOQUACIOUS

Postby Philip Hudson » Mon Sep 17, 2012 3:49 pm

I vaguely remember Dr Seuss. From the description of the book, it is horrible. I am glad my children didn't read it. I am all for preserving a good environment; but the subject is too complex to discuss, placing blame, in a children's book. Do you like green eggs and ham?

Loquacious should go in beautiful words 101-200.
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Re: LOQUACIOUS

Postby call_copse » Tue Sep 18, 2012 7:07 am

Philip Hudson wrote:I vaguely remember Dr Seuss. From the description of the book, it is horrible. I am glad my children didn't read it. I am all for preserving a good environment; but the subject is too complex to discuss, placing blame, in a children's book. Do you like green eggs and ham?

Loquacious should go in beautiful words 101-200.


I think Dr Seuss stands the test of time pretty well. It is hard to resist a well planned bit of anapestic tetrameter. I would certainly strongly disagree that such subjects are too complex to discuss in a children's book - some discussion of attribution is always welcome and I think the Lorax is a particularly good example of this. It discusses the topic in a very appropriate manner to my way of thinking. I agree that a balanced approach is necessary - however 'unless' someone cares...
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Re: LOQUACIOUS

Postby Philip Hudson » Tue Sep 18, 2012 11:02 am

call_copse: The reply I wrote is a severe restatement of what I first wrote. If you had read my tentative offering, you may have called out the men with a straight jacket. I understand your posting and respect your right to your opinion. But my opinion is unchanged and it is even stronger than what I actually posted.
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Re: LOQUACIOUS

Postby call_copse » Wed Sep 19, 2012 7:35 am

Most restrained of you Philip! I wouldn't have minded your unedited version or thought less of you for it - even in the UK we know to make allowances for Texans, I would have just been amused.

Would it have perchance contained the mantra 'Drill baby drill!'? :wink:
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Re: LOQUACIOUS

Postby Philip Hudson » Thu Sep 20, 2012 12:37 am

call_copse: Perhaps I will enlarge on my environmental comment some time in the future. It is not an easy write. In the meantime, let me assure you that I am for protecting the environment, am concerned about global warming, and am sure that our environmental, governmental and industrial experts haven't got a clue.

Since I love England as much as I love Texas, please do make allowances for me. I have been in England many times. I have been to your Southampton twice and really enjoyed the naval history there. Most of my time in England has been spent in Northampton and Staines-upon-Thames where my employer had major subcontractors. I also have very dear friends in Yorkshire. Come visit me in Texas and see that we are sort of civilized here.
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Re: LOQUACIOUS

Postby call_copse » Thu Sep 20, 2012 7:40 am

Clearly this is not the forum to wax loquacious on such contentious issues, but I am always interested in people's opinions on such topics and how they have come to pass.

For myself I take many more journeys by cycle than by motorised vehicle. It's not much but I accept I cannot affect what others do and it keeps me healthy.

I know and like many Texans and do not hold contrary opinions against people. I do think however it may be wise to avoid excessive judgement about how people's lives have resulted in their outlooks and how they choose to bring up their children.
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Re: LOQUACIOUS

Postby Philip Hudson » Thu Sep 20, 2012 1:36 pm

call_copse: I think things are copacetic between us, as I like things to be between and among friends.
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Re: LOQUACIOUS

Postby misterdoe » Sun Sep 23, 2012 2:40 pm

The late and unlamented situation "comedy" Homeboys in Outer Space had as a main character a sentient ship's computer named Loquatia, who Never. Shut. Up.
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