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TURKEY

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Re: TURKEY

Postby MTC » Fri Nov 23, 2012 12:37 pm

It appears turkeys will occupy our forums and refrigerators for at least the next few days. With that in mind, I thought it would be well to remember the turkey's remote ancestor the feathered dinosaur archaeopteryx before chomping down on that leftover drumstick. An archaeopteryx, complete with teeth and claws, would present a somewhat less appetizing picture on the Thanksgiving table. Lincoln Rockwell meets Jurassic Park, you might say. Bon appetit!
Last edited by MTC on Sat Nov 24, 2012 1:04 pm, edited 4 times in total.
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Re: TURKEY

Postby Perry Lassiter » Fri Nov 23, 2012 1:04 pm

We do indeed deep fry turkeys. My son-in-law is a graduate chef and fries one for us every year. He's working off shore right now, so my daughter brought one yesterday from a Cajun cookery.
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Re: TURKEY

Postby damoge » Fri Nov 23, 2012 2:19 pm

Evidently there is a growing problem with them in Massachusetts as well. They have invaded the town of Brookline (nearly a part of Boston, too urban to call suburban, but not a lot of high rise buildings) and are intimidating the locals. People (rightly) cross the street to avoid being attacked...
All too funny!
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Re: TURKEY

Postby LukeJavan8 » Fri Nov 23, 2012 2:50 pm

There are dozens and dozens of them inhabiting the
local university. The students tease them and the hens
are getting downright mean, they are now going after
the students in return. But someone has to be feeding
them to attract so many. Over this holiday the U
is conducting a clean up effort to rid the campus of the
"nesters".
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Re: TURKEY

Postby Philip Hudson » Fri Nov 23, 2012 8:16 pm

call_copse: Deep-fried turkey and other large cuts of meat are surprisingly very good. We have it a lot in Texas. The frying does not add measurable fat to the meat and the hot oil cooks the meat thoroughly and quickly. We had two deep fried turkeys for Thanksgiving yesterday and, if you had eaten our turkey, you would not have known it was fried. It is not like Southern fried chicken, crusted with a lot of greasy batter. My mother fried batter-less chicken, beefsteak, pork chops and etc. in a skillet (Southern for fry-pan) and they weren't greasy. I suppose I am being a little disloyal to Texas because chicken fried steak (i.e. beefsteak fried like chicken with gobs of batter) seems to be our state food.

Contrary to some “sophisticated” USA palates, I find English food quite good, especially the full English breakfast. The last time I was in Southampton, I had a great breakfast served to me by a delightful nonagenarian lady who rode her bicycle to work.

Whatever you choose to eat, bueno apetite!
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Re: TURKEY

Postby Slava » Fri Nov 23, 2012 10:44 pm

Here is an article on the turkeys pardoned each year by the sitting President.
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Re: TURKEY

Postby Philip Hudson » Sat Nov 24, 2012 1:19 am

Slava: You know that an elected official in the USA is not sitting (except in the sense that he might be a sitting duck). They serve, preside, represent, etc. Elected officials in England sit.
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Re: TURKEY

Postby damoge » Sat Nov 24, 2012 11:56 am

can you explain the difference? why "sitting" cannot be used in America?
Never knew this.
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Re: TURKEY

Postby LukeJavan8 » Sat Nov 24, 2012 12:22 pm

No thrones, other than the porcelain one.
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Re: TURKEY

Postby damoge » Sat Nov 24, 2012 1:49 pm

but elected officials don't sit on thrones, do they?
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Re: TURKEY

Postby LukeJavan8 » Sat Nov 24, 2012 2:12 pm

Actually some may, but I don't know: like the
"Lord" Mayor of London,e.g. Some chair of
authority.
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Re: TURKEY

Postby damoge » Sat Nov 24, 2012 2:41 pm

oh, now I get it! in England they have seats of authority, here we just have horses' asses!
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Re: TURKEY

Postby Slava » Sat Nov 24, 2012 2:51 pm

Philip Hudson wrote:Slava: You know that an elected official in the USA is not sitting (except in the sense that he might be a sitting duck). They serve, preside, represent, etc. Elected officials in England sit.

holding an official position or office; occupying an appointed or elected seat; incumbent: a sitting pontiff.

in session or at work; active: a sitting legislature.
I do believe this works anywhere.
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Re: TURKEY

Postby Perry Lassiter » Sat Nov 24, 2012 5:12 pm

Well, if it's a politician or bureaucrat, I doubt seriously they are at work. Am I a cynic or a realist?
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Re: TURKEY

Postby damoge » Sat Nov 24, 2012 5:39 pm

why is that an either/or?
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